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MSc in Quantum Fields and Fundamental Forces at Imperial College London

  1. Jun 17, 2009 #1
    I'm an Electronic and communication Engineer, and I'm living in the Caribbean, and i want to study MSc in Quantum Fields and Fundamental Forces Imperial College London, since in its description seems very likely what I'm looking for, which is,...
    I'm looking a course that can place me in,... where A. Einstein and all quantum scientists stood,.. specific in the UNIFICATION problem...
    and the msc at imperial college seems right,... but i would like some help,... i need to know the cost,... if can one work at the same time to pay it ?,... or some experience from anyone that has taken it ,... i need all advice possible,... thanks,..
     
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  3. Jun 17, 2009 #2

    dx

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    I'm not sure how much physics electronic and communication engineers generally study, but you should make sure you have the prerequisites for the course. Have you studied Lagrangian & Hamiltonian mechanics, quantum mechanics and special relativity?
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2009
  4. Jun 17, 2009 #3

    cristo

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    Non-EU fees are £17,750, apparently (http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/pgprospectus/whatcanyoustudy). I guess you could probably get a weekend job, but anything more than that and you would be risking your studies. This will also be limited by the amount of work your student visa allows.


    However, dx's point is very valid. This course only accepts students with a first class (or equivalent) in physics. You will need to contact the admissions tutor to ask whether your degree is sufficient.
     
  5. Jun 17, 2009 #4
    well i just don't understand, because in its description of the mSc,... says clearly,... that's a gap between UNDERGRADUATE,... and the frontier in physics (a nice way to say that put one far),... I study quantum mechanic by my own,.. but i only have ENG degree,... just that,... if someone has not taken a degree in Lagrangian & Hamiltonian mechanics, quantum mechanics and special relativity can not take that msc ? because i have studied a little bit of that, but as i said i don't have any degree particular in physics,... :(
     
  6. Jun 17, 2009 #5

    dx

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    I'm afraid a little bit won't do. You must have thorough knowledge of these areas to be able to learn quantum field theory, not to mention many other essential topics in physics and mathematics that one learns as an undergraduate.

    I don't know whether they will accept people who don't have physics degrees, but either way, you must at least be able to prove to them that you have the required knowledge to undertake the course.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2009
  7. Jun 17, 2009 #6
    OK,... thank you very much for your helps !!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  8. Jun 17, 2009 #7

    malawi_glenn

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    You could first obtain a bachelor degree in physics before considering more advanced and specified physics programs such as masters.
     
  9. Jun 17, 2009 #8

    ... and which bachelor degree do you know that could help,.. to put me on trail,..?
    in this field...
     
  10. Jun 17, 2009 #9
    do you think this one can help me ...?????

    http://www.chalmers.se/en/sections/education/masterprogrammes/programme-descriptions/fundamental-physics [Broken]


    (that one is in Sweden)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  11. Jun 17, 2009 #10

    malawi_glenn

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    Just get a BACHELOR degree in PHYSICS.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachelor's_degree

    3 years of studies, math and physics. A masters program reqiure this degree in my country (sweden)

    The most important thing for you is to learn the adequate math and physics before even considering particle physics etc, who knows, maybe you think the formalism of particles sucks?

    I wanted to do experimental nuclear physics when I started my bachelor, but now I am phd student in theoretical elementary particle physics... so it goes up and down, getting a bachelor degree and a quite broad masters degree is best one. So start to look for a bachelor degree program before even considering masters.

    And since you have some engineering background, I guess you can do the 3 year bachelor program in 2years if you study more than normal speed.

    If you want to come to the frontier of unification, i.e. String Theory etc, you need LOADS of math also....

    for chalmers, you can always send them copies of your degrees and course plans etc and see what they say. If you don't have the classes one has in the bachelor program in physics, then you have nothing to do in a masters program.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  12. Jun 17, 2009 #11
    well the case is: I'm living in the Dominican republic,... and... here that field of physics we don't have, the government is giving post grade scholarship,... and one of those univ,.. is to Chalmers, i see you point,... to star well from the beginning but thats would be harder for me instead take the master program, I'm checking the program http://www.chalmers.se/en/sections/education/masterprogrammes/programme-descriptions/fundamental-physics/programme-plan [Broken]

    (please check out the link)
    and its seems for me that i can (with a lot of hard work studying), achieve to come to the frontier of unification,... :/

    do you think I'm making a mistake ?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  13. Jun 17, 2009 #12

    malawi_glenn

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    without adequate background, you will have no chance to absorb or learn the material.
     
  14. Jun 19, 2009 #13
    Yeah, I think they're looking for the big boys. They wouldn't let me into the QFFF MSc with a 2:1 in physics!
     
  15. Jun 19, 2009 #14
    Whats a 2:1?
     
  16. Jun 19, 2009 #15

    malawi_glenn

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    relative amount of physics classes I think.
     
  17. Jun 19, 2009 #16

    cristo

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    It's a grade classification, used in the UK. While the US have GPA and other countries have similar things, degrees in the UK are given a classification. From the top: first class, upper second class (2:1), lower second class (2:2), third class, pass.
     
  18. Jun 19, 2009 #17
    Yes, the classifcation depends on the average of your modules:

    70+ :1st class
    60 - 69% :2:1
    50 - 59% :2:2
    40 - 49% :3rd class
     
  19. Jun 19, 2009 #18

    George Jones

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    I don't think that even this breakdown can be used at face value for a comparison between the UK and North America, as, I think, average marks tend to be different in the UK than in North America.
     
  20. Jun 19, 2009 #19

    cristo

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    Agreed. I don't think a mark of 70% would be given an "A" in North America, whilst it is in the UK.
     
  21. Jun 19, 2009 #20
    Good point.
     
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