Muon lifetime measurement experiment

In summary, the conversation revolved around a question regarding the treatment of time resolution as a systematic in a muon lifetime measurement. The participants also discussed the setup of the experiment and the challenges they faced with the scintillators and coincidence detection scheme. The idea of using a delay line made of LEMO cables and the stability checks with Monte Carlo (MC) were also mentioned. The conversation ended with the participants expressing their interest in the experiment and thanking each other for the information provided.
  • #1
Aleolomorfo
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TL;DR Summary
How to treat time resolution as a systematic in a muon lifetime measurement?
Hello everybody!

I have a question regarding my physics laboratory at the university. I am performing the measure of muon lifetime. The setup is quite standard (coincidence measurement with plastic scintillators).
My question is about the time resolution. I have tried to see if the time resolution could affect as a systematic my result. To prove this, I have acquired only coinciding events and I measure the difference in time of such signals. Theoretically, it should be zero, but due to many factors this time intervals follow a gaussian distribution. My question is about the way in which I can take into consideration this systematic. Should I take the ##\sigma## of the gaussian fit or should I repeat the measure many times and take as systematic position drift of the coincidence peak?
 
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  • #2
The best approach would be to fold the exponential function with your resolution function and then use that in the fit (plus all the other stuff needed). In practice this shouldn't matter unless your time resolution is a large fraction of the muon lifetime.
 
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  • #3
Aleolomorfo said:
Summary: How to treat time resolution as a systematic in a muon lifetime measurement?

Hello everybody!

I have a question regarding my physics laboratory at the university. I am performing the measure of muon lifetime. The setup is quite standard (coincidence measurement with plastic scintillators).
My question is about the time resolution. I have tried to see if the time resolution could affect as a systematic my result. To prove this, I have acquired only coinciding events and I measure the difference in time of such signals. Theoretically, it should be zero, but due to many factors this time intervals follow a gaussian distribution. My question is about the way in which I can take into consideration this systematic. Should I take the ##\sigma## of the gaussian fit or should I repeat the measure many times and take as systematic position drift of the coincidence peak?

Hi Aleolomorfo.
Muon detection is of great interest to me as well. Would you please describe the scintillator paddle dimensions, spacing and thickness, and mention which coincidence detection scheme is being used? i.e. NIM or student built such as Dr H. Matis' design.

Thanks

George Dowell
 
  • #4
geoelectronics said:
Hi Aleolomorfo.
Muon detection is of great interest to me as well. Would you please describe the scintillator paddle dimensions, spacing and thickness, and mention which coincidence detection scheme is being used? i.e. NIM or student built such as Dr H. Matis' design.

Thanks

George Dowell

Hello George Dowell,

I have attached the final report where you can find the information you need.

One thing to notice: last year the particle physics laboratory had too many students, so we were chosen to perform the measurement of the muon lifetime with electronic modules and scintillators found quickly around the university. Consequently, they were not the best ones and we had many problems... our job was not so strightforward. But you can extract the main idea behind the experiment.

If you have any question, ask freely!
 

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  • Muoni_Nuovo_2018-2019.pdf
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  • #5
Thank you, nice report, well written. The first effort I've seen to capture Cosmic "Ray" muons.

As a hardware person, the difficulties with scintillators and NIM support units is well appreciated.
I liked the part about an impromptu delay line made "of many LEMO cables".

The one I'm working on now is a single 3" X 3" BGO scintillator inside an 800 pound lead shield.

George Dowell
 
  • #6
Did you do the stability checks with MC? Doing it with the main dataset is problematic - if you change the analysis based on what looks better you can get some biases. It is interesting to see what looks like a systematic trend for muon lifetime as function of bins.
 
  • #7
mfb said:
Did you do the stability checks with MC? Doing it with the main dataset is problematic - if you change the analysis based on what looks better you can get some biases. It is interesting to see what looks like a systematic trend for muon lifetime as function of bins.

No, we did not. We only used the dataset but I see your point, we should have used MC.
 
  • #8
Aleolomorfo said:
Hello George Dowell,

I have attached the final report where you can find the information you need.

One thing to notice: last year the particle physics laboratory had too many students, so we were chosen to perform the measurement of the muon lifetime with electronic modules and scintillators found quickly around the university. Consequently, they were not the best ones and we had many problems... our job was not so strightforward. But you can extract the main idea behind the experiment.

If you have any question, ask freely!
Again thanks for the report. I have spent considerable time reading it and several others and also consulted with a moderator to get a better understanding of the aims and the procedure.
From what I see in your paper, you are using multiple organic scintillators at the same time, correct? And recording their coincidences.
In your experiment are the original pulse and the secondary pulse detected in the same scintillator or on two or more? The reason I ask is there are two approaches to working with muons using organic scintillators and I want to understand more.

Thank you.

George Dowell
 
  • #9
Hello George!

geoelectronics said:
From what I see in your paper, you are using multiple organic scintillators at the same time, correct? And recording their coincidences.

Yes, we use three scintillators at the same time, one over the other. We record a start signal from the passage of a muon in the first and the second scintillator (the events we are interested in are the ones in which the muon stops in the middle scintillator). So the start signal is a coincidence between the upper and the middle scintillator. Then we expect a signal from the decay of the muon. The muon decay mainly in electron/positron and neutrino/antineutrino. We expect a signal (the charged lepton) in the upper or the lower scintillator in a gate of 10 ##\mu s##. This is the main idea.

geoelectronics said:
In your experiment are the original pulse and the secondary pulse detected in the same scintillator or on two or more?

We have always used the same three scintillator
 

What is a muon lifetime measurement experiment?

A muon lifetime measurement experiment is a scientific experiment that aims to measure the average lifetime of a muon, which is a subatomic particle that is similar to an electron but with a much larger mass. This experiment is important in understanding the fundamental properties of muons and their interactions with other particles.

Why is it important to measure the muon lifetime?

Measuring the muon lifetime is important for several reasons. First, it helps us understand the fundamental properties of muons and their behavior. Second, it can provide insights into the Standard Model of particle physics and potentially reveal new physics beyond the Standard Model. Finally, it has practical applications in fields such as medical imaging and nuclear power.

How is the muon lifetime measured?

The muon lifetime is typically measured using a technique called the "time-of-flight" method. This involves detecting the arrival time of muons at a certain location and comparing it to the time they were created. By measuring the time it takes for muons to decay, scientists can calculate the average lifetime of muons.

What equipment is needed for a muon lifetime measurement experiment?

A muon lifetime measurement experiment requires specialized equipment such as detectors to detect the arrival and decay of muons, a particle accelerator to produce a beam of muons, and a data acquisition system to record and analyze the data. Additionally, a shielding system is needed to protect the experiment from external sources of radiation.

What are the potential challenges in conducting a muon lifetime measurement experiment?

One of the main challenges in conducting a muon lifetime measurement experiment is the short lifetime of muons, which is only about 2.2 microseconds. This requires precise and fast detection systems to accurately measure their decay time. Additionally, background radiation from sources such as cosmic rays can interfere with the experiment and must be carefully controlled for accurate results.

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