Need advice on whether solid state physics is something for me

In summary: I'm going to try looking into one of the programs over there. :)Though in summary, solid state physics may be a good route into nanotechnology if you have a physics or math background. Another route to consider is to do a natural science minor and potentially do original research.
  • #1
anonymous188
17
0
Hey everybody,

I apologize if this is not in the right forum, or if it is not within the scope of this website. I would like to go to grad school in the field of nanotechnology. I'm a physics and math major at the moment, but I'm not entire sure which field of physics would complement nanotechnology that much. I hear that solid state physics may be my best bet, but I'm a little unsure what the topic is comprised of, as it is a relatively broad area. Would anybody be willing to give a summary of what solid state physics is, or can anyone enlighten me as to another possible alternative that would help me to eventually do nanotechnology? Many thanks for any responses.

-Alex W.

P.S. If anybody is offended by people joining these forums for a one-time post then leave, please know that I like these forums and am here to stay. I just haven't thought of any other questions to ask. :)
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
oops

Now that I think about it, I may have meant to say condensed matter, rather than solid state physics. Same questions apply. See post for details. :)
 
  • #3
Basically condensed matter physics, chemistry and materials science are all viable routes for getting into the nano field. The two latter will more likely lead you into fabrication of nanostructures but not neccessarily.
 
  • #4
Thanks for the reply. I'm thinking of also doing a natural science minor (half biology classes, half chemistry classes) to hopefully help me down the road. It seems, however, easier to do a pure physics field in grad school rather than a hybrid of physics, biology, and chemistry. Also, I read that grad schools are very interested in the type of research the undergraduate has done. My school does offer some research, but it is mostly in the field of particle physics. Does anyone know of any type of outside organization that offers research to undergraduates? I've done some homework and come across REU, but the programs seem selective, and I'm not sure if I'll be admitted even applying to 6-10 different REU programs. Are there examples of undergraduates who do research on their own, without any outside help? If this is a viable option, I would like to do some original research. Any help would be appreciated.

-Alex W.
 
  • #5
Solid State Physics is now largely Condensed Matter Physics, but that is what one would study in conjunction with nanotechnology.

Nanotechnology may be embedded in Materials Science/Engineering programs. The engineering is afterall, Applied Physics.

I searched Google with "Nanotechnology","Condensed Matter Physics" and found -

http://www.le.ac.uk/ph/research/cmp/

http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofMathematicsandPhysics/con/

http://www.cmmp.ucl.ac.uk/

http://www.phys.canterbury.ac.nz/research/condensed.shtml#NanotechnologyProgramme
http://www.phys.canterbury.ac.nz/research/condensed_matter/nano.shtml

http://www.physics.utoronto.ca/research/qocmp/cmp/

http://www.phys.washington.edu/users/seidler/cmexp.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Condensed_matter_physics

So look at CMP programs and see what they do with nanotechnology.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #6
I'm considering the same thing, thanks for the links!

*edit: Well I'm not in the UK, but thanks anyways
 
Last edited:

1. What is solid state physics?

Solid state physics is a subfield of physics that studies the physical properties of solids, such as their structure, composition, and behavior under different conditions. It involves the study of materials at the atomic and molecular scale, as well as the macroscopic level.

2. What are the applications of solid state physics?

Solid state physics has numerous applications in various fields, including electronics, materials science, and engineering. It is essential for the development of new technologies and devices, such as semiconductors, transistors, and solar cells.

3. What skills and knowledge are required for studying solid state physics?

Solid state physics requires a strong foundation in classical mechanics, electromagnetism, and quantum mechanics. It also involves a deep understanding of mathematics, including calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra. Additionally, familiarity with computer programming and experimental techniques is beneficial.

4. What career opportunities are available in solid state physics?

Solid state physics offers a wide range of career opportunities in academia, research institutions, and industries. Graduates can pursue careers as researchers, professors, materials scientists, engineers, and consultants in various fields, such as electronics, renewable energy, and nanotechnology.

5. Is solid state physics a suitable field for me?

To determine if solid state physics is a suitable field for you, it is essential to have a strong interest in physics, mathematics, and problem-solving. It also requires a high level of dedication and perseverance, as well as the ability to think critically and creatively. If you enjoy studying the properties of materials and their applications, then solid state physics may be the right field for you.

Similar threads

Replies
4
Views
819
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
22
Views
1K
Replies
6
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
30
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
9
Views
1K
  • Science and Math Textbooks
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
2
Views
952
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
3
Views
373
Replies
16
Views
1K
Back
Top