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Need some Pre-Calculus books recommendation

  1. Dec 2, 2015 #1
    Hi,


    I am starting my EE degree next year in October and need some refreshment for Pre-calculus.

    I am considering the book "Pre-Calculus workbook for dummies 2nd edition".
    What do you think about it? Any better choices ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 2, 2015 #2
    I can think of no better approach than the online ALEKS pre-calculus course. It is smart enough to identify your strengths and weaknesses and give you more practice in the areas you need it most.
     
  4. Dec 2, 2015 #3
    I would avoid the "For Dummies" series of books, there are much better options out there (though admittedly textbooks will cost you a lot more).

    I used Precalculus: A Right Triangle Approach by Lial/Hornsby, and it had great coverage of material and hundreds of exercises for every section. It also explains how many of the sections will be applicable to calculus.

    I have heard nothing but good things about the ALEKS pre-calculus course Dr. Courtney referred to as well.
     
  5. Dec 3, 2015 #4
    "fundamentals of freshman mathematics" by Allendoerfer/Oakley has a clear and informative presentation of the pre-calculus and some topics of calculus. Another good book is "Basic Mathematics" by Serge Lang and "Precalculus in a Nutshell" by G. Simmons.
     
  6. Dec 4, 2015 #5
    Oakley is a good choice, is the book you recommended Bacte, the same as Principles Of Mathematics? I own a copy of Principles.

    For geometry, which in a calculus class, which typically consist of Stewart. Geometry is not necessarily needed, just the results of the proofs. Usually ratios etc.

    But if you want to learn geometry, I would recommended Jacobs Geometry and Edwin E. Moise Geometry. Both are great books, Jacobs is a lot easier than Moise, but Moise makes the subject come alive.
     
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