1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Normally open switch & Normally closed switch.

  1. Apr 11, 2013 #1
    This is not really a homework question. Just a question regarding the normally open (NO) and normally closed switches.

    For an NO switch, if the button is pressed (not open anymore) and then the button is released, is the switch still in the "not open" state or does it go back to the open state?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 11, 2013 #2

    gneill

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Usually a Normally Open switch has contacts that connect only as long as the switch is operated (think of a doorbell button being pressed to ring a buzzer; spring action breaks the contact as soon as finger pressure is released).
     
  4. Apr 12, 2013 #3

    CWatters

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I don't believe "an NO switch" is a sufficient description to answer the question.

    I'd say it depends if the push button switch is a "latching" or "non-latching/momentary" type...

    Non-Latching/momentary: Switch is closed only while the button is pressed. So when you release it the switch returns to the open condition.

    Latching: Switch is open when the button is in the "out" position. When pressed the button moves to the "in" position and the switch is closed. When released the button stays depressed and the switch stays closed. When pressed again the button comes out and the switch opens.

    The above describes a NO type but either can be NC or both (eg they have both NO and NC terminals).
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Normally open switch & Normally closed switch.
  1. Switch Bounce (Replies: 2)

  2. Transistor as a switch (Replies: 60)

Loading...