Norton Equivalent and Source Transformation problem

In summary, the conversation discusses a person's difficulty with source transformation and finding the Norton equivalent for a given circuit. The circuit is described with specific values for current and voltage, and the person asks for help on the Physics Forums website. The respondent suggests checking previous problems and providing an attempt at solving the problem before seeking help. The respondent also asks the person what they know about Norton-equivalents.
  • #1
tjenk48
1
0

Homework Statement



Basically, I'm having trouble doing the source transformation and subsequently finding the norton equivalent for this circuit and I don't really know where to start.
The circuit is attached where:
i=3A
V=90V

Please help!
 

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  • #2
Hi tjenk, welcome to PF.

You got a template when you started your thread. Fill in, please! Read https://www.physicsforums.com/showpost.php?p=4021232&postcount=4]:
Why did nobody answer my post?

It happens quite a lot on this forum. Somebody posted a question and doesn't get answers. Or he does get answers, but not the ones he anticipated. This is very unfortunate. This is why we have compiled a list of items to watch for improving your posts.

Did you provide an attempt at solving the problem?
This is perhaps the most common mistake that new members make. When posting homework, if you do not make any attempt yourself, then other people are not allowed to help at all! This holds particularly true in the homework forums!
Of course, many people do not know where to begin, so how could they make an attempt. Well, an attempt could consist out of many things: check the theory in the textbook to see if there is something relevant, check previous problems to see if there is something you can use, draw a picture, try to find an intuitive answer by visualizing the problem,...

So, what do you know about a Norton-equivalent of a circuit?

ehild
 
Last edited:

Related to Norton Equivalent and Source Transformation problem

1. What is the Norton Equivalent circuit?

The Norton Equivalent circuit is a simplified representation of a complex circuit that contains a current source and a parallel resistor. It is used to analyze the behavior of a circuit at a particular node or branch.

2. How is the Norton Equivalent circuit different from the Thevenin Equivalent circuit?

The Norton Equivalent circuit uses a current source and a parallel resistor, while the Thevenin Equivalent circuit uses a voltage source and a series resistor. The two circuits are equivalent in terms of their behavior at a particular node or branch, but they have different internal structures.

3. What is Source Transformation in relation to Norton Equivalent circuits?

Source Transformation is a technique used to convert a voltage source and series resistor into a current source and parallel resistor, or vice versa. This technique can be used to simplify complex circuits and make them easier to analyze using the Norton Equivalent method.

4. How is the Norton Equivalent current calculated?

The Norton Equivalent current is calculated by short-circuiting the load resistor in the original circuit and finding the current that flows through the short circuit. This current is then used as the current source in the Norton Equivalent circuit.

5. Can the Norton Equivalent circuit be applied to any circuit?

Yes, the Norton Equivalent circuit can be applied to any linear circuit, which means it follows Ohm's law and has constant resistance. Non-linear circuits, such as those containing diodes or transistors, cannot be simplified using the Norton Equivalent method.

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