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Notation for marking the voltage drop in this picture

  1. Dec 24, 2014 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    When we write the V_0 on the right of the diagram as show below, between which two points does the voltage drop refer to? There are two nodes on the top correct? I am assuming the voltage drop refers to the two rightmost nodes.

    I've tried to circle the nodes.

    See this link:

    http://i.imgur.com/kutasHe.png

    2. Relevant equations
    It's just a notation question.

    3. The attempt at a solution
    It's not a homework problem.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 24, 2014 #2

    Bystander

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    Good assumption.

    Boy, what a lousy problem.
     
  4. Dec 24, 2014 #3
    What is the rule for the notation in general?

    Is it common to just mark voltage as height on the paper as opposed to between specific nodes?
     
  5. Dec 24, 2014 #4

    Bystander

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    Are there standard conventions/notations for circuit diagrams? I'm certain there almost have to be. Are they universally applied? Not in the 50 odd years I've been deciphering them. Check NEMA, IEEE, Giaccaletto, Kaufman & Seidman, who else .....
     
  6. Dec 24, 2014 #5

    NascentOxygen

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    Because it's written beside an element, I'd say in general a marked voltage will be the voltage across that element. Yes, in this case it follows that it's the potential difference between the rightmost nodes.
     
  7. Dec 24, 2014 #6

    ehild

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    And that element is the current generator. So the marked voltage is across it.
     
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