Voltage drop and current through each resistor

In summary, the conversation discusses determining voltage drop and current through each resistor in a circuit using Ohm's law and parallel and series total resistance equations. The issue of having both parallel and series components is raised, and suggestions are given for solving the problem. Additionally, the importance of using legible figures in explanations is emphasized.
  • #1
SacredBlood
1
0

Homework Statement


Determine the voltage drop and current through each resistor.
195f51d3e80c33278adbb400fac60146.png


*This is just my sketch of the problem since I couldn't take a clear picture of it.

Homework Equations


Ohm's law
V= IR

Parallel total resistance
Req=1/R1+1/R2+1/R3+...

Series total resistance
Req=R1+R2+R3+...

The Attempt at a Solution



I'm having troubles understand what I should do when there's more than just a parallel or series in a circuit.

If this were just a parallel problem then I would simply add up the resistors using the Req=1/R1+1/R2+1/R3+... equation and since I know that voltage is the same across a parallel circuit then I could simply solve for the total current (Ieq) by rearranging Ohm's law Ieq=V/Req from there I can figure out voltage drop and current through every resistor using V1=IeqR1, V2=IeqR2,... and I1=V/R1, I2=V/R2,...

I would follow the same steps in a series circuit problem with the exception being that I would use Req=R1+R2+R3... instead of Req=1/R1+1/R2+1/R3+...

Now, with my problem, I have both parallel and series. How should I go about doing this?

I tried simplifying the circuit down and got an Req=14.6 ohms with the Voltage still being 10 volts. In this case would I use this Req value to calculate Ieq and just use that for the voltage drop and then just divide voltage by every resistor to figure out the current through each?

Maybe I don't understand circuits correctly. I'm not sure. Any help/explanation is very much appreciated!
 
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  • #2
With the equivalent resistance you can calculate the current through the 6 ohm resistor and the parallel combination (the current would split up through the two branches of the parallel combination though).
That means you can calculate the voltage over the 6 ohm resistor and the total voltage over the two parallel branches.
 
Last edited:
  • #3
Welcome to Physics Forums.

A suggestion: When posting figures, you should use sufficient resolution so that the figure easily conveys all of the information. The values in your figure are simply not legible. For example, I would not have guessed the DC voltage to be 10 V - as you stated.
 
  • #4
TomHart said:
The values in your figure are simply not legible.
+1 on that
For example, I would not have guessed the DC voltage to be 10 V - as you stated.
Neither would I since it clearly says 20v in the figure
 
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Likes TomHart

Related to Voltage drop and current through each resistor

1. What is voltage drop?

Voltage drop refers to the decrease in electrical potential energy that occurs as an electric current flows through a circuit. It is caused by the resistance of the circuit components and is measured in volts.

2. How is voltage drop calculated?

Voltage drop can be calculated using Ohm's Law, which states that voltage (V) is equal to the product of current (I) and resistance (R). So, V=IR. Additionally, the voltage drop across each resistor can be calculated by multiplying the current (I) by the resistance (R) of that particular resistor.

3. What factors affect voltage drop?

There are several factors that can affect voltage drop, including the resistance of the circuit components, the length and thickness of wires, and the amount of current flowing through the circuit. Additionally, the type of material used and temperature can also impact voltage drop.

4. How does voltage drop affect current through each resistor?

In a series circuit, the same current flows through each resistor. So, as the voltage drops across each resistor, the current will also decrease. This is because the total voltage in a circuit is equal to the sum of voltage drops across each component.

5. How can voltage drop be minimized?

To minimize voltage drop, you can use thicker wires with lower resistance, reduce the length of the wires, and use materials with lower resistance. Additionally, you can also decrease the amount of current flowing through the circuit by using components with higher resistance values.

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