Nsert this equation in a pdf file

  • Thread starter Nusc
  • Start date
  • Tags
    File Pdf
In summary, to insert a long equation in a PDF file without it being cut off, you can use the split environment to break it up into multiple lines and use \left. and \right. for parentheses that span multiple lines. For square roots, you can end the square root and use an overline for the rest of the equation. The identity operator can be written as \mathbf{1} and equations can be formatted without an equation number by using \nonumber before \end{equation}.
  • #1
Nusc
760
2

Homework Statement



Hi. I need to insert this equation in a pdf file such that it doesn't cut off. How can I make it appear without cutting off?

Homework Equations



[tex]
\noindent\(\sqrt{\frac{1}{2} e^{\frac{1}{2} \text{$\kappa $u} (-4 u+4 \text{u0}+\text{$\kappa $u})} \sqrt{\pi } \text{$\kappa $u} \left(\text{Erf}\left[u-\text{u0}-\frac{\text{$\kappa
$u}}{2}\right]+\text{Erf}\left[\text{u0}+\frac{\text{$\kappa $u}}{2}\right]\right)^2-\frac{1}{4} e^{\text{$\kappa $u} (-4 u+4 \text{u0}+\text{$\kappa
$u})} \pi \text{$\kappa $u}^2 \left(\text{Erf}\left[u-\text{u0}-\frac{\text{$\kappa $u}}{2}\right]+\text{Erf}\left[\text{u0}+\frac{\text{$\kappa
$u}}{2}\right]\right)^4}\)
[/tex]

The Attempt at a Solution

 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2


I'm assuming that your equation is simply too long. I use the split environment to break up long equations. It looks something like this:
Code:
\begin{equation}
\begin{split}
first part of really long equation = &\cdots \\
&second part of really long equation
\end{split}
\end{equation}
The two backslashes (\\) represent the end of that line. The ampersands (&) are alignement marks. They will be aligned on each line. Aside from that, do note that if you are using braces that go onto more than one line, then \left. and \right. will need to be used. If the entire example above is parenthized, it will look like:

Code:
\begin{equation}
\begin{split}
\left( first part of really long equation = &\cdots  \right. \\
& \left. second part of really long equation \right)
\end{split}
\end{equation}

p.s. Watch the placement of the alignment marks. I've found that if they come before or after certain symbols/characters, you'll get a compilation error that doesn't really lend itself to that. Good luck
 
  • #3


Hey Minger, it's just one expression, not equation sign and it's a large square root.

What do I do then?
 
  • #4


How do you make the identity operator in latex?
not mathbf{1}
 
  • #5


About your square root problem. I would personally just end the square root, then start an over line, so something like:
Code:
\begin{equation}
\begin{split}
a &= \sqrt{ really long part of square root } + \cdots \\
\cdots & \overline{ second part of square root}
\end{split}
\end{equation}

I'm not sure what you mean by the identity operator
 
  • #6


How can I do this wihtout writing it as an equation:

\noindent\(\sqrt{blah}\)
 
  • #7


I'm trying to format output made by mathematica into latex
 
  • #8


Why does it "need" to not be an equation? Many math symbols and such are only available within the equation processor. You can do a "quick" equation by simply using two dollar signs
Code:
$$
put your equation here
$$
However, that doesn't allow the split processor inside of it. If the only objection to the equation is that it puts an auto number on it, you can suppress the numbering by puting
Code:
\nonumber
right before the
Code:
\end{equation}
 

1. What is the purpose of inserting an equation in a PDF file?

The purpose of inserting an equation in a PDF file is to include mathematical or scientific equations in a document that can be easily shared and viewed by others. This is especially useful for academic or research papers.

2. How do I insert an equation in a PDF file?

To insert an equation in a PDF file, you can use a PDF editor or converter software. Many popular programs, such as Adobe Acrobat and Nitro Pro, have built-in features for adding equations to a PDF file.

3. Can I insert any type of equation in a PDF file?

Yes, you can insert any type of equation in a PDF file as long as the equation is supported by the software you are using. This includes mathematical, scientific, and even complex equations such as differential equations.

4. Will the equation be editable after it is inserted in the PDF file?

It depends on the software you are using. Some PDF editors allow you to edit equations after they are inserted, while others may only allow you to view them. It is important to check the features of the software before inserting the equation.

5. Can I insert multiple equations in one PDF file?

Yes, you can insert multiple equations in one PDF file. You can either insert each equation on a separate page or use the software's features to arrange multiple equations on one page. This allows for a more organized and cohesive document.

Similar threads

  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
309
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
0
Views
495
  • Differential Geometry
Replies
2
Views
888
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
140
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
901
Replies
0
Views
449
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
584
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
Back
Top