Nuclear Engineering opportunities in Switzerland?

In summary, Switzerland has four working power plants and several other research reactors. Entry level nuclear engineers working at a power plant in Switzerland can expect to make an average of around 120,000 Swiss francs per year. There are no barriers to entry for foreigners, but PhD research projects and jobs at power plants are competitive.
  • #1
Hercuflea
596
49
I have just been browsing through some articles on Switzerland's Nuclear policies and it appears they have four working power plants and several other research reactors. I know they have ITER, and that would be great, but I am sure it is extremely competitive to get in there. Does anyone know what the average entry level nuclear engineer working at a power plant in Switzerland can expect to make? Also what are the barriers to entry for foreigners, if any? I have been going through the Federal Office of Energy's website, and there doesn't seem to be much information on careers, but there is some interesting info on PhD research projects (http://nes.web.psi.ch/structure_staff.html) and Master's programs. I might be interested if I could hold a nuclear job while going to school there. That's another thing, the funding situation seems a bit confusing...do they pay stipends like in the US or is it pay to play?

Would it be realistic to get a job at a PP in Switzerland with a master's degree and continue working on a PhD part time while at the PP?
 
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  • #2
  • #3
Astronuc said:
One should look at opportunities at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Willigen. http://www.psi.ch/ I know of a number of foreigners who work at PSI.

I know people at Swiss Light Source, which is part of PSI.

Depending on your interests, EMPA might be worth looking at (i'm pretty sure it is an English-speaking institution). http://www.empa.ch
 
  • #4
Thanks for the info. Do you know of any websites that could give me a good idea of an engineers salary and visa requirements in Switzerland? Like equivalent to the bureau of labor and statistics?
 
  • #5
I can't tell you much about it, except that they are planning to close every power plant until 2034 (reason: politics after Fukushima). I don't know if this is useful information for you neither, but that's something I know!
 
  • #6
Hercuflea said:
Thanks for the info. Do you know of any websites that could give me a good idea of an engineers salary and visa requirements in Switzerland? Like equivalent to the bureau of labor and statistics?

Visa information - http://www.bfm.admin.ch/bfm/en/home/themen/einreise/visumantragsformular.html
http://www.eda.admin.ch/eda/en/home/reps/nameri/vusa/ref_visinf/visusa.html#ContentPar_0020

It is perhaps best to contact PSI directly.


http://www.psi.ch/pa/working-at-psi

http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/inf86.html
. . . .
NOK Axpo, operating Beznau and Leibstadt, is part of the Axpo Group owned by the cantons in the northeastern part of the country. Another utility consortium ATEL (now Alpiq) owned 40% of Gosgen and 27.4% of Leibstadt.

In 2009 ATEL merged with EOS to form Alpiq Holding SA, the country's largest power utility. Early in 2009 EdF increased its stake in Alpiq to 25%. One third of Alpiq's electricity is nuclear.

. . . .
 

Related to Nuclear Engineering opportunities in Switzerland?

1. What kind of nuclear engineering opportunities are available in Switzerland?

Switzerland has a strong focus on nuclear energy and thus offers a variety of opportunities in this field. Some of the most common roles include nuclear engineers, radiation protection specialists, nuclear safety analysts, and nuclear waste management experts.

2. What are the requirements for working in nuclear engineering in Switzerland?

In order to work in nuclear engineering in Switzerland, you will need a relevant degree in nuclear engineering or a related field. You will also need to obtain a license from the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) in order to work with nuclear materials.

3. Are there any specific companies or organizations in Switzerland that specialize in nuclear engineering?

Yes, there are several companies and organizations in Switzerland that focus on nuclear engineering. Some of the most well-known include the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI), the Paul Scherrer Institute, and the Swiss Association for Nuclear Energy (SVIN).

4. What are the benefits of pursuing a career in nuclear engineering in Switzerland?

There are several benefits to pursuing a career in nuclear engineering in Switzerland. These include a strong and stable job market, competitive salaries, and the opportunity to work on cutting-edge technology and research in the field.

5. Are there any specific skills or qualifications that are highly valued in the Swiss nuclear engineering industry?

In addition to a relevant degree and license, there are certain skills and qualifications that are highly valued in the Swiss nuclear engineering industry. These include strong analytical and problem-solving skills, attention to detail, and a good understanding of nuclear regulations and safety protocols.

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