Optical Adder Using 2 Lasers & Selectable Intensities

In summary, the conversation discusses the use of 2 lasers with varying light intensities to produce a sum when shone on a photo detector. This method allows for the measurement of the current and implementation of parallelism. However, the challenge lies in creating a fully optical system, as the current photodetector is not purely optical and requires electronic extraction. The scientists involved in this research are trying to find a way to manipulate light with light, with the main obstacle being the lack of suitable materials. However, some elements, such as optical transistors, read/write capable memory, all optical amplifiers, and optical buffers, have already been demonstrated.
  • #1
010101
3
0
If we use 2 lasers with selectable light intensities as input, with each level of intensity corresponding to decimal number.
Like
level 0 intensity - decimal 0 (MIN)
level 1 intensity - decimal 1
level 2 intensity - decimal 2
...
level 9 intensity - decimal 9 (MAX)

and directly shine both of them over photo detector, there intensities will add up to produce sum. thus we can measure the current from photo detector to see what number is it.
we can also use laser of other frequencies to implement parallelism.

I know this solution is simple but I don't get it why won't it work either.
 
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  • #2
The photodetector is not optical, you have to extract an electronic signal from it.
 
  • #3
So they also want detector to be fully optical, that means output to be pure light and that means all optical memory with read and write capabilities.
That thing would be difficult to make.
 
  • #4
Who is "they"? Fully optical elements would allow some things to be faster in some specialized systems.
 
  • #5
they means the scientists. One question though what is the bone of contention in realizing full optical computing ?
is it the material which is lacking to manipulate light with light. from what I have googled most say it is the material, while these things (optical transistor, the read/write capable memory, the all optical amplifiers, optical buffers) have already been demonstrated.
 
  • #6
All those things rely on manipulating light with light in some way.
 

Related to Optical Adder Using 2 Lasers & Selectable Intensities

What is an optical adder using 2 lasers and selectable intensities?

An optical adder is a device that uses light to perform mathematical addition operations. It utilizes two lasers and selectable intensities to add two binary numbers together.

How does an optical adder using 2 lasers and selectable intensities work?

The two lasers emit light beams of different intensities. These beams are directed to a beam splitter, which combines them into a single beam. The resulting beam is passed through a nonlinear medium, which changes the intensity of the light based on the input binary numbers. The altered beam is then directed to a detector, which measures the intensity and converts it into a binary output.

What are the advantages of using an optical adder compared to traditional electronic adders?

Optical adders have the potential to be faster and more energy-efficient than traditional electronic adders. They also have the capability to process multiple bits simultaneously, making them suitable for high-speed computing and data processing.

What are the limitations of an optical adder using 2 lasers and selectable intensities?

One limitation is that it requires precise alignment of the lasers and the beam splitter for accurate results. It is also affected by external factors such as temperature and vibrations, which can impact the intensity of the light beams. Additionally, the cost of the equipment and materials needed for an optical adder may be higher compared to traditional electronic adders.

What are the potential applications of an optical adder using 2 lasers and selectable intensities?

Optical adders can be used in various fields such as high-speed computing, telecommunications, and data processing. They can also be integrated into optical computing systems, which have the potential to revolutionize the way we process and store data.

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