Others: let you be the judge

  • Thread starter Loren Booda
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In summary, the conversation discusses the tendency to make assumptions and judgments about strangers, and the question of whether it is natural or ethical to do so. The conversation also delves into the idea of fleeting relationships and the potential for paranoia in online interactions. One participant shares their experience at Physics Forums and addresses assumptions made about their knowledge and interests in physics.
  • #1
Loren Booda
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How many times have you found yourself silently blaming, labeling or demeaning a total stranger whom either you pass on the street or otherwise not had the opportunity to "walk a mile in his/her moccasins"? Is it natural or ethical to suspect those to whom we are unaccustomed? (Kinda reminds me of the Billy Joel song Stranger.) Can we acknowledge all those we glance, or are fleeting relationships as a whole doomed by paranoia to the entropy of the social ashbin, especially now online?

Quite frankly, I can barely keep up with the few threads, let alone posters, I participate with at PF. I believe that many of us have wildly incorrect assumptions about other members. Let this thread be devoted to debunking and reconciling the personal theories that we have constructed about each other at Physics Forums. For instance:

I often seem ignorant of physics. This is primarily due to my love of speculation, or as one poster put it, I attempt to "think outside the box." (My website, below, is an example of my hubris.) My physics is spotty, having fully pursued it last when I obtained my Master's degree, almost 20 years ago. I now enjoy more the social side of life, although hampered by my "hunt and peck" typing and occasional difficulty reading the monitor. While writing, I obsessively proofread mi werk.

- Loren
 
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  • #2
Loren Booda said:
(My website, below, is an example of my hubris.)
That looks like a really cool site, Loren. I'll try to check it out when the others are off-line.
 
  • #3
z

First of all, I appreciate your vulnerability and honesty in sharing your thoughts and experiences. It takes courage to open up and acknowledge our own biases and assumptions about others. And I completely agree that we often jump to conclusions about people without truly knowing their story or walking in their shoes. It's natural for us to make quick judgments based on our own limited perspective and experiences, but it's not ethical to do so without taking the time to truly understand and empathize with others.

I also agree that online relationships can be particularly challenging because we don't have the opportunity to interact with people in person and get a better sense of who they are. It's easy to hide behind a screen and make assumptions about someone without truly knowing them. However, I believe that it's possible to have meaningful and genuine connections with people online if we approach it with an open mind and a willingness to understand and learn from others.

As for your own experiences at Physics Forums, I appreciate your self-awareness and willingness to acknowledge your own limitations and strengths. It's admirable that you continue to pursue your passion for physics and engage in discussions, despite your struggles with typing and reading. And I think it's important for us to remember that everyone has their own unique perspective and way of thinking, and that's what makes discussions and debates so interesting. So let's continue to challenge each other's ideas and assumptions, but also remember to approach each other with empathy and understanding. Thank you for sharing your thoughts and personal experiences.
 

1. What is the concept of "Others: let you be the judge"?

"Others: let you be the judge" is a phrase that encourages individuals to make their own judgments and decisions about a particular situation or topic, rather than relying on the opinions or judgments of others.

2. How is the concept of "Others: let you be the judge" relevant in the scientific community?

In the scientific community, the concept of "Others: let you be the judge" is relevant in promoting critical thinking and independent analysis. Scientists are encouraged to question and evaluate evidence, theories, and conclusions for themselves, rather than blindly accepting the opinions of others.

3. How can the concept of "Others: let you be the judge" benefit society as a whole?

The concept of "Others: let you be the judge" can benefit society by promoting individual autonomy and reducing the influence of biased or uninformed opinions. It encourages people to think for themselves and make informed decisions, leading to a more knowledgeable and independent society.

4. Can "Others: let you be the judge" be applied in all situations?

While the concept of "Others: let you be the judge" can be applied in many situations, it is important to consider the context and potential consequences of making individual judgments. In some cases, seeking the opinions and expertise of others may be more beneficial.

5. How can individuals practice the concept of "Others: let you be the judge" in their daily lives?

Individuals can practice the concept of "Others: let you be the judge" by actively seeking and evaluating information from multiple sources, questioning their own biases and assumptions, and making informed decisions based on their own analysis and critical thinking skills.

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