Pendulum and Oscillating Motion

In summary, the conversation discusses how to find the tension in the string of a pendulum at the bottom of its swing, with the given information of the pendulum's length, bob's mass, and speed. The conversation also mentions the use of trigonometric functions and the understanding of forces on the pendulum bob to solve the problem.
  • #1
cstout
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0

Homework Statement


A pendulum is 0.8 m long and the bob has a mass of 1.0 kg. At the bottom of its swing, the bob's speed is 1.8 m/s. What is the tension in the string at the bottom of the swing?

I don't even know how to get started on this problem, I think it has something to do with using the sin or cos but I can't find an example problem like this in my book.
 
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  • #2
At the bottom of its swing, the only two factors putting forces on the bob must be the rope (tension) and gravity (weight). Thus, the two together must be the net force. What else is special about the motion of a pendulum bob? How is the velocity changing?
 
  • #3


I can offer some guidance on how to approach this problem. First, we need to understand the basic principles of pendulum and oscillating motion. A pendulum is a weight suspended from a pivot point that can freely swing back and forth. This motion is called oscillation and is governed by the laws of physics, specifically the principles of energy and motion.

To solve this problem, we can use the equation for the tension in a string, which is given by T = mgcosθ, where T is the tension, m is the mass of the bob, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and θ is the angle between the string and the vertical direction. In this case, we can assume that the angle is 90 degrees since the bob is at the bottom of its swing.

Next, we need to find the value for g, which is approximately equal to 9.8 m/s^2. We can also use the equation for velocity in a pendulum, which is given by v = √(2gl(1-cosθ)), where v is the velocity, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and l is the length of the pendulum. In this case, we know the velocity (1.8 m/s) and the length (0.8 m), so we can solve for g.

Once we have the value for g, we can plug it into the equation for tension and solve for T. This will give us the tension in the string at the bottom of the swing.

In summary, to solve this problem, we need to use the equations for tension and velocity in a pendulum, as well as the known values for mass and length. By using these principles, we can determine the tension in the string at the bottom of the swing.
 

Related to Pendulum and Oscillating Motion

1. What is a pendulum?

A pendulum is a weight suspended from a fixed point that can swing back and forth under the influence of gravity. It is a simple harmonic oscillator, meaning it follows a regular pattern of motion called oscillation.

2. How does a pendulum work?

A pendulum works by converting potential energy into kinetic energy as it swings back and forth. When the pendulum is at its highest point, it has maximum potential energy. As it swings downward, the potential energy is converted into kinetic energy. The pendulum continues to swing back and forth until friction and air resistance slow it down and eventually stop it.

3. What factors affect the period of a pendulum?

The period of a pendulum, or the time it takes for one complete swing, is affected by three main factors: the length of the pendulum, the force of gravity, and the amplitude (angle) of the swing. The longer the pendulum, the longer the period. The stronger the force of gravity, the shorter the period. And the larger the amplitude, the longer the period.

4. What is the difference between simple and compound pendulums?

A simple pendulum has a single point of support, while a compound pendulum has multiple points of support. This means that the motion of a simple pendulum is governed by a single pivot point, while the motion of a compound pendulum is more complex and may involve multiple axes of rotation.

5. How is pendulum motion used in real life?

Pendulum motion is used in many real-life applications, such as clocks, metronomes, and seismometers. It is also used in amusement park rides, such as the swinging pirate ship. Pendulums are also used in scientific experiments to demonstrate concepts such as gravity and energy conversion.

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