Photon & Magnetism: Force Carrier?

In summary, photons are force carriers in such a way that since they spin around a particle so fast, their paths have become effectively a barrier, hence the force.
  • #1
richerrich
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In magnetism does a photon (or stream of) spin around a particle to create magnetic force? Or to ask this another way, are photons force carriers in such a way that since they spin around a particle so fast, their paths have become effectively a barrier, hence the force.
 
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  • #2
No.
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  • #3
richerrich said:
In magnetism does a photon (or stream of) spin around a particle to create magnetic force? Or to ask this another way, are photons force carriers in such a way that since they spin around a particle so fast, their paths have become effectively a barrier, hence the force.

This could be an interesting explanation to my question (from particleadventure.org):
"It turns out that all interactions which affect matter particles are due to an exchange of force carrier particles, a different type of particle altogether. These particles are like basketballs tossed between matter particles (which are like the basketball players). What we normally think of as "forces" are actually the effects of force carrier particles on matter particles.

The basketball animation is, of course, a very crude analogy since it can only explain repulsive forces and gives no hint of how exchanging particles can result in attractive forces.

We see examples of attractive forces in everyday life (such as magnets and gravity), and so we generally take it for granted that an object's presence can just affect another object. It is when we approach the deeper question, "How can two objects affect one another without touching?" that we propose that the invisible force could be an exchange of force carrier particles. Particle physicists have found that we can explain the force of one particle acting on another to INCREDIBLE precision by the exchange of these force carrier particles.

One important thing to know about force carriers is that a particular force carrier particle can only be absorbed or produced by a matter particle which is affected by that particular force. For instance, electrons and protons have electric charge, so they can produce and absorb the electromagnetic force carrier, the photon. Neutrinos, on the other hand, have no electric charge, so they cannot absorb or produce photons."
 
  • #4
richerrich, you ought to read Feynman's "QED". It is a very approachable little book that explains everything.
 
  • #5
JDługosz said:
richerrich, you ought to read Feynman's "QED". It is a very approachable little book that explains everything.

Thank you.
 

Related to Photon & Magnetism: Force Carrier?

1. What is a photon?

A photon is a tiny particle of light, also known as an elementary particle. It has no mass and travels at the speed of light.

2. How does a photon interact with matter?

A photon can interact with matter through absorption, emission, or scattering. In absorption, the photon transfers its energy to an atom or molecule, causing it to become excited. In emission, the excited atom or molecule releases the energy as a new photon. In scattering, the photon changes direction after interacting with the atom or molecule.

3. What is the role of photons in electromagnetism?

Photons are the force carriers of the electromagnetic force. They carry the electromagnetic force between charged particles, such as electrons and protons. Photons are responsible for all electromagnetic interactions, including light, electricity, and magnetism.

4. How do photons and magnetism relate to each other?

Photons and magnetism are closely related through the electromagnetic force. When an electric charge is accelerated, it produces a magnetic field, and vice versa. This relationship is described by Maxwell's equations, which show that changing electric and magnetic fields can create each other. Photons, as the force carriers of the electromagnetic force, are responsible for this relationship.

5. Can photons be affected by magnetic fields?

Yes, photons can be affected by magnetic fields. This is because photons have an intrinsic property called spin, which is related to their angular momentum. When a photon travels through a magnetic field, its spin aligns with the field, causing the photon to change direction. This phenomenon is called the Faraday effect and is the basis for many technologies, such as optical isolators and magneto-optic memory devices.

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