Physics-electron charge transfer

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In summary, the metallic sphere initially had a charge of +4.2 nC and the negatively charged rod had a charge of -6.0 nC. When the rod touched the sphere, 7.3E9 electrons were transferred, resulting in a new charge of 3.066 nC for the sphere and a new charge of -6.0000000073 nC for the rod. The net charge (total charge) on both objects cannot change.
  • #1
kokenwa
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physics--electron charge transfer

A metallic sphere has a charge of +4.2 nC. A negatively charged rod has a charge of -6.0 nC. When the rod touches the sphere, 7.3E9 electrons are transferred. What are the charges of the sphere and the rod now?


i don't even know where to begin. can i get some help?
 
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  • #2
kokenwa said:
When the rod touches the sphere, 7.3E9 electrons are transferred.
How much charge is that in terms of nC? What's the charge on each electron?

Realize that the net charge (the total charge on both objects) cannot change.
 
  • #3
the charge on each electron is 1.6E-19C or 1.6E-10nC.
 
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  • #4
kokenwa said:
the charge on each electron is 1.6E-19.
Right: That's the charge of each electron in C. So when you add 7.3E9 electrons to the sphere, by how much does the charge on the sphere change?

And the charge on the rod? It just lost that number of electrons, so how did its charge change?
 
  • #5
i got 3.066nC for the sphere by multiplying the transfer charge by the nC charge for the sphere but i can't find it for the rod. what do i do next?
 
  • #6
I assume you mean that you added the negative charge from the electrons to the original positive charge of the sphere to get the new charge of the sphere. (What was the total negative charge of the electrons that were transferred in nC?)

To find the new charge of the rod, do the opposite: subtract the negative charge. For example: If something has a charge of -5 nC and loses -1 nC (of electrons), its charge is now just -4 nC.
 

Related to Physics-electron charge transfer

1. What is an electron charge transfer?

An electron charge transfer is the movement of an electron from one atom to another. This transfer of charge is what allows for the creation of electricity and is a fundamental concept in the field of physics.

2. How does electron charge transfer occur?

Electron charge transfer can occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as conduction, induction, and electrostatic attraction. In conduction, electrons move through a conductor, such as a wire, while in induction, the movement of charged particles creates an electric field that induces the transfer of electrons. Electrostatic attraction occurs when two objects with opposite charges are brought close together, causing the transfer of electrons between them.

3. What is the role of electrons in charge transfer?

Electrons are negatively charged particles that are responsible for the transfer of charge in an atom. They are found in the outermost shell of an atom and can easily move between atoms, allowing for the transfer of charge. Without electrons, charge transfer would not be possible, and electricity could not be generated.

4. What is the significance of electron charge transfer in everyday life?

Electron charge transfer plays a crucial role in many aspects of our daily lives. It is the basis for the functioning of electronic devices, such as computers and cell phones, and is a vital component in the generation and distribution of electricity. Understanding electron charge transfer also helps us to develop new technologies and improve existing ones.

5. How is electron charge transfer studied in physics?

In physics, electron charge transfer is studied through various experiments and theoretical models. Scientists use instruments such as voltmeters and ammeters to measure the flow of electrons and observe the effects of charge transfer. Theories such as quantum mechanics and electromagnetism also provide a framework for understanding the behavior of electrons and their role in charge transfer.

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