Physics meets art history

  • Thread starter pcoates
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  • #26
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Extremely clear---one of those things that seems obvious once it is pointed it out.

If I understand you, even though you apply only compressive forces, the failing tool is always under shear stress, tensile stress, or both, because the pressure deforms it (in various ways, depending upon tool shape, homogeneity of the workpiece, etc.)

This has inspired me to look closer at what is going on, and I think I've been looking at the problem backwards. I think I can show everything I need to experimentally, starting with showing that a taper angle too great for the oblique attack will still work for the straight in attack. (Actually, I know this is true already, from experience.)
 
  • #27
5,439
7
If I understand you, even though you apply only compressive forces, the failing tool is always under shear stress, tensile stress, or both, because the pressure deforms it (in various ways, depending upon tool shape, homogeneity of the workpiece, etc.)
Exactly so, except that part about homogeneity of the workpiece, which affects the workpiece material not the tool. I added this stuff for interest.
 

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