Physics Problem Book Recommendation

In summary, the conversation discusses a student's experience with a physics test that included challenging problems not found in the textbook or recommended problem book. They are seeking recommendations for an interesting or challenging physics problem book and are advised to try the REA Physics book, Kleppner's Intro to Mechanics, Irodov's book, or Herbert Goldstein's book. They also mention that Schaum's 3000 problems set is not suitable for a physics major and recommend Kleppner's, French's, or Kittel's books for first-year physics.
  • #1
avonrepus
4
0
I'm currently attending Physics I: Mechanics Course
I took the first test, and the test included problems that were not
on textbook nor a recommended problem book, i.e. schaum's 3000 problems..
The problems were interesting twists on the concepts, the problems were not
so difficult, but I was taken aback by them.
If anyone can recommend interesting or challenging physics problem book
, that would help me so much
 
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  • #2
You can try the REA Physics book.
 
  • #3
Kleppner's Intro to Mechanics has a great set of challenging HW problems. Most of the "classic" physics test problems are in there along with some other very interesting problems.
 
  • #4
Get Irodov's book (problems in general physics).
 
  • #5
avonrepus said:
The problems were interesting twists on the concepts, the problems were not
so difficult, but I was taken aback by them.

Your instructor probably wants to find out whether you can think, not just remember previously-seen solutions. :wink:
 
  • #6
jtbell said:
Your instructor probably wants to find out whether you can think, not just remember previously-seen solutions. :wink:

Well, by solving variety of problems, I will be actually studying for the test by working through problems. I think theorems and applications of it must be studied together to increase my understanding. And I'm not going to memorize the solutions themselves, by working with them, I'm looking for the methods of solving. New relationships can open ways to many others.

Btw, thanks for the recommendations
 
  • #7
avonrepus said:
I'm currently attending Physics I: Mechanics Course
I took the first test, and the test included problems that were not
on textbook nor a recommended problem book, i.e. schaum's 3000 problems..
The problems were interesting twists on the concepts, the problems were not
so difficult, but I was taken aback by them.
If anyone can recommend interesting or challenging physics problem book
, that would help me so much

i would like to suggest you to do herbert goldstein 3rd edition
the problems are challenging
 
  • #8
schaum's 3000 problems set is a joke for a physics major in my opinion.
for first year physics look at kleppner's/french's/kittel's books.
if you pick at least two of them or even one you could rest assure that you have the best book for this introductory course in mechanics.
 

What is a good physics problem book for beginners?

One highly recommended physics problem book for beginners is "Fundamentals of Physics" by David Halliday, Robert Resnick, and Jearl Walker. It covers a wide range of topics and includes step-by-step solutions to problems.

Does the recommended physics problem book cover all topics in physics?

No, most physics problem books will not cover all topics in physics. They usually focus on specific areas such as mechanics, electromagnetism, or thermodynamics. It is important to choose a book that aligns with your specific needs and interests.

Are there any online resources for physics problem books?

Yes, there are many online resources for physics problem books. Some popular options include Khan Academy, OpenStax, and the MIT OpenCourseWare. These resources offer free access to textbooks, problem sets, and solutions.

What are some features to look for in a good physics problem book?

A good physics problem book should have clear and concise explanations, a variety of practice problems with varying degrees of difficulty, and step-by-step solutions. It should also cover a range of topics and have plenty of real-world examples.

Can physics problem books be used for self-study?

Yes, physics problem books can be a great resource for self-study. They usually include detailed explanations and solutions, making it easier for individuals to learn at their own pace. However, it is recommended to also seek guidance from a teacher or tutor for a better understanding of the subject.

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