Pin Connection with one support reaction?

  • Thread starter RadiationX
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  • #2
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The link is not working. I can't access your diagram.
 
  • #3
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It is working for me. Do you have a pop-up blocker on? The link pops up in a new tab for me( runnning Firefox).

If that wont work, right click on the image and select copy image location and paste that in to your browser.
 
  • #4
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Sorry, there's no response from the site whatever method I use.

I'm outside the USA, maybe that's it.
 
  • #6
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OK, I got the pic. There's only one member connected to G, so only one reaction, but two on A. Is that what's troubling you ?
 
  • #7
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Yes, so if there is only one member connectecd then only one reaction is needed? I thought that pin connection always had two reactions regardless of the members.


BTW thank you.
 
Last edited:
  • #8
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In a statics problem, one resolves the forces at each node with the constraint that the total is zero because nothing is moving.

At A there are two forces to be resolved into the horizontal reaction, at G there's only one.

I don't see what is causing you a problem. Am I missing something.
 
  • #9
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No, I was missing something. You cleared it up for me :O
 
  • #10
No, I was missing something. You cleared it up for me :O
i m not still clear plz help me out. Both A and G are pin connected then why there is one support reaction at G and two at A
 
  • #11
PhanthomJay
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i m not still clear plz help me out. Both A and G are pin connected then why there is one support reaction at G and two at A
Members subject to forces at their hinges only (a force at each end, with no forces in between the ends) are known, appropriately, as "two-force" members, and in order for the member to be in equilibrium, the forces acting on the member at each end must be equal and opposite and co-linear, acting along the longitudinal 'axial' axis of the member. Since the sole member at G is horizontal, the force acting on it at the pin, G, must be horizontal, with no vertical component.
 
  • #12
Members subject to forces at their hinges only (a force at each end, with no forces in between the ends) are known, appropriately, as "two-force" members, and in order for the member to be in equilibrium, the forces acting on the member at each end must be equal and opposite and co-linear, acting along the longitudinal 'axial' axis of the member. Since the sole member at G is horizontal, the force acting on it at the pin, G, must be horizontal, with no vertical component.
Thanks alot i got it :)
 

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