Please help me in starting my job search as an EE undergrad graduating soon.

In summary, the conversation discusses a student's concerns about finding a job after graduating with a BSEE degree. The student has a strong background with internships and leadership positions, but is worried about getting a job they don't like and maintaining professional relationships. The conversation suggests defining what they are looking for in a job, not worrying about getting stuck in a bad job, taking opportunities to learn and experiment, and actively reaching out to professional contacts for advice and potential job leads. The advice also emphasizes starting the job search early and being open to different opportunities.
  • #1
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Hi everyone. I'm in my last semester of my BSEE degree. I want to get a decent job when I graduate in May. On paper I have a lot of things going for me, but my head is a total mess right now when I start thinking about it. I'm really scared I won't find anything, or if I do, something I really don't like.

My selling points:
  • 3 internships @ SPX, Electrolux, Medtronic. All were great experiences and I know my former supervisors would speak highly of me.
  • Former president of local IEEE chapter
  • Former vice president of social fraternity
  • Founder & president of racquetball club team
  • Good overall grades, ~3.5 GPA

I do have about ~15 professional contacts that I could contact. I think what scares me the most is the possibility of getting a dead-end job and feeling like all my hard work was in vain. Also, while I am good in interviews, I am not the best at actually contacting people and maintaining those relationships.

Can you guys give me some advice, maybe even help me come up with a plan? This is a huge deal for me, and if anyone here does help me out a lot, I will be sure to reward them when I do get a job. I appreciate all your concern and attention ahead of time.
 
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  • #2
1. You might want to start by defining as specifically as you can - and for yourself only - what you're looking for. If you could have a dream job land in your lap after you graduate, what would it look like? What activities do you enjoy? What projects have you worked on that gave you a sense of satisfaction or accomplishment? What situations would you like to avoid? 9-5 or 'freestyle' hours? etc.

2. Try not to worry too much about getting stuck in something you don't like. The days of permanent careers with a single company are going the way of the dinosaur. If you don't like a position, you can always quit and find something else - and there are ways to do this without burning bridges or enduring tremendous financial hardships.

3. With point 2 being said, sometimes you have to take what you can get for the time-being. Chances are you won't land the perfect job right out of school. The things is, even the bad jobs you can learn from. And you can use them as solid place from which to experiment and expand.

4. The thing with contacting people is to just do it. Put together a cover letter and a resume and then email them. Start out simple. If they don't have a specific position, tell them you're graduating soon, remind them of your relationship, point out your interests and experience, and ask if they have any leads on positions that might be of interest, or if they have any advice for you. (Most people like to be asked for advice.)

5. Start early. Right now isn't too soon.
 

1. How early should I start my job search as an EE undergrad?

It is recommended to start your job search at least 6-9 months before your expected graduation date. This will give you enough time to research companies and positions, network, and apply for jobs.

2. What are some important resources for starting my job search as an EE undergrad?

Some important resources include career fairs, job search websites, and networking events. Your university's career center and alumni network can also be valuable resources.

3. How can I make my resume stand out as an EE undergrad?

Highlight your relevant experience, skills, and projects related to your field. Use industry-specific keywords and tailor your resume to each job application. Also, include any leadership roles, internships, or extracurricular activities that demonstrate your abilities and interests.

4. What should I expect during job interviews as an EE undergrad?

Expect to be asked about your technical knowledge, problem-solving skills, and relevant experience. It is also important to research the company beforehand and prepare thoughtful questions to ask the interviewer.

5. How can I improve my chances of getting hired as an EE undergrad?

In addition to having a strong resume and performing well in interviews, networking can greatly improve your chances of getting hired. Attend industry events, connect with professionals on LinkedIn, and reach out to alumni for advice and potential job opportunities.

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