Q: Electromagnet - Insulated vs Bare

In summary: I had found the link to the original post but lost it. After reading through your posts, it seems that the insulation on the wire may not be necessary. For the electromagnet to work, the wire must be insulated, as the iron nail could short circuit it.
  • #1
DkEnrgyFrk
10
0
There is a post on this forum stating that the insulation should be left on the wire to prevent a short circuit thus making the electromagnet ineffective. Lost the link and can't find it now.
But I am finding multiple articles on the internet that are using bare wire.
Ex of bare: http://www.wikihow.com/Create-an-Electromagnet
Ex of insulated: http://www.energizer.com/learning-center/science-center/Pages/make-electromagnet.aspx
There are multiples on the web of both versions of creating the electromagnet, both insulated and non.

Why is either version working? Is there a right way or a wrong way?
 
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  • #2
The information provided in first article is incorrect. Look at the pictures, they seem to be just collected from here and there. The cable in first picture is different, wires are smaller. Then in next two pictures the wire is thicker. And see, if the wire is not insulated, the iron nail would short circuit it.

Ideally, the coil wire should always have insulation on it. The wire for making coils, using in transformers, inductors etc. comes with a tiny varnish or enamel coating so the insulation is very thin. This type of wire visibly looks like non-insulated but its not. The closer the turns of coil are, the better its inductance - this is why special enamel coated wire is used - it allows you to make turns very close but still insulated.

If you use an ordinary non-insulated wire, one possible thing to do, is carefully wind the turns close but not touching each other. But this way inductance won't be very good.
 
  • #3
GingerLee said:
The information provided in first article is incorrect. Look at the pictures, they seem to be just collected from here and there. The cable in first picture is different, wires are smaller. Then in next two pictures the wire is thicker. And see, if the wire is not insulated, the iron nail would short circuit it.

...

so true ... gosh I can't believe how much garbage there is on the net for something that is so simple to make
I even left a message posted on the first link stating the pobvious fault ;)


Dave
 
  • #4
Thank you both for confirmation.
 
  • #5


I would like to clarify that both insulated and bare wire can be used to create an electromagnet. The key factor here is the flow of electricity through the wire, not the presence or absence of insulation.

Insulation is used to prevent the flow of electricity and to protect the wire from damage. In the case of an electromagnet, the flow of electricity is necessary to create a magnetic field. Therefore, insulation is not necessary for the functioning of the electromagnet. However, it may be used for safety purposes.

On the other hand, bare wire allows for better conduction of electricity, which can result in a stronger magnetic field. This is why some sources may recommend using bare wire for making an electromagnet.

Ultimately, the effectiveness of an electromagnet depends on factors such as the type of wire, the amount of current flowing through it, and the number of coils. Both insulated and bare wire can work effectively in creating an electromagnet, and there is no right or wrong way to do so. It is important to follow proper safety precautions and use the appropriate materials for the desired outcome.
 

Q: What is an electromagnet?

An electromagnet is a type of magnet that is created by passing an electric current through a coil of wire. The current creates a magnetic field around the wire, making it behave like a magnet.

Q: What is the difference between an insulated and bare electromagnet?

The main difference between an insulated and bare electromagnet is the presence of insulation material around the wire. In an insulated electromagnet, the wire is coated with an insulating material such as plastic or rubber, while a bare electromagnet has no insulation. This insulation helps to protect the wire and prevent short circuits.

Q: What are the advantages of using an insulated electromagnet?

Insulated electromagnets have several advantages over bare electromagnets. Firstly, the insulation helps to prevent short circuits and damage to the wire, making it more durable. Additionally, the insulation can help to reduce the risk of electric shocks and make the electromagnet safer to handle. Lastly, the insulation can also improve the efficiency of the electromagnet by reducing energy loss due to heat.

Q: When should I use an insulated electromagnet?

Insulated electromagnets are typically used in situations where safety and durability are important factors. This includes applications such as medical equipment, transportation systems, and industrial machinery. They are also commonly used in household appliances such as refrigerators and washing machines.

Q: What are the potential drawbacks of using an insulated electromagnet?

One potential drawback of using an insulated electromagnet is that the insulation can add extra weight and bulk to the wire, making it less efficient and less powerful. Additionally, the insulation may also limit the maximum current that can pass through the wire, which could affect the strength of the magnetic field. However, these drawbacks are often outweighed by the benefits of using an insulated electromagnet in certain applications.

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