B Quantum Entanglement Violates the Laws of Physics

Summary
We've all seen the example: Push one domino over. It falls. But so does another domino way off to the side. Only one is pushed, yet two fall.
The problem with this is that only one push's worth of energy was expended. One push's worth of input cannot produce two push's worth of output, for this would violate the law that says you can't get more movement out of something than the amount of force you exert onto it (to put is very simply). Quantum entanglement would mean miraculously multiplying the input so as to get more output for free. I don't think physics would allow that.
 
Now someone may say, "If you apply two push's worth of force on the one domino, then both would fall." But that still doesn't make sense, because if you apply two push's worth of force on one domino, then it itself would move twice as far as from one push's worth. So that one domino is always absorbing the total amount of force you exert upon it, leaving zero force available to move the second domino without violating a law.

If entanglement exists, everything that is entangled would be harder to push, pull, lift or destroy.
 
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Mentz114

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Now someone may say, "If you apply two push's worth of force on the one domino, then both would fall." But that still doesn't make sense, because if you apply two push's worth of force on one domino, then it itself would move twice as far as from one push's worth. So that one domino is always absorbing the total amount of force you exert upon it, leaving zero force available to move the second domino without violating a law.

If entanglement exists, everything that is entangled would be harder to push, pull, lift or destroy.
On the contrary, spin entanglement conserves angular momentum.

Your domino model is wrong. The vertical dominos are meta-stable and fall under the influence of gravity if disturbed. Energy and momentum are conserved. High school physics.
 
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one domino is always absorbing the total amount of force you exert upon it, leaving zero force available to move the second domino without violating a law.
If your argument were correct, it would show that multiple dominos cannot be pushed over with one push. But, as you yourself admit, this actually can happen. Therefore your argument is obviously wrong.

Thread closed.
 

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