Question about power extension board

  • Thread starter kenny1999
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I have a home appliance that should be plugged into one single wall socket because it's energy consuming, and shouldn't share with other appliances by common sense. However, due to some practical problems, I can't plug it directly into the wall socket. If I use a power extension board (i.e. 1 to 2 or 3 or 4...) to serve as an intermediate, while all other sockets on the extension board are not used. Is it scientifically the same as it directly plug into the main wall socket?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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The Power Extension Board my not be able to carry the current required.

Why not make up a short, dedicated heavy cable, extension cord to go between the appliance and the outlet?
 
  • #3
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The Power Extension Board my not be able to carry the current required.

Why not make up a short, dedicated heavy cable, extension cord to go between the appliance and the outlet?

Sorry I don't understand. Any pictures of example?
 
  • #4
berkeman
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Sorry I don't understand. Any pictures of example?
I don't know what a "power extension board" is, but a heavy duty extension cord looks like this:

https://www.waytekwire.com/images/items/10212FL.gif
1564943929312.png
 
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  • #5
DaveE
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I have a home appliance that should be plugged into one single wall socket because it's energy consuming, and shouldn't share with other appliances by common sense. However, due to some practical problems, I can't plug it directly into the wall socket. If I use a power extension board (i.e. 1 to 2 or 3 or 4...) to serve as an intermediate, while all other sockets on the extension board are not used. Is it scientifically the same as it directly plug into the main wall socket?
It's hard to answer without actually seeing what you have.
Look for safety agency approvals, like UL, UR, ETL, CSA, TUV, CE, etc. If your not sure about the letters you are seeing, look online for clarification. Then look for a current or power rating marked on the device or packaging. If you aren't exceeding these ratings, then you should be ok.
If it was made (i.e. brand labeled) by a big electronics company like GE, ABB, Levitron, Hubbell (Gucci and Walmart don't count), and you are observing their limits, then it should be OK. They don't want to damage their brand with bad products.
There is a lot of cheap electronic stuff you can buy these days, but good product design requires that the device be able to carry the power/voltage/current that the compatible outlet is designed for.
 

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