Questioning Truth: The Struggle of a Scientist in Pursuit of Knowledge

  • Thread starter Quest Ion
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Quest Ion
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How did you find PF?
I literally did a search for "physics forums". lol
Hi. I'm an independent researcher within the realm of philosophy and the sciences. I am a huge questioner, so I continually doubt (or way more than "second guess") what I have accepted as truth. This questioning impulse sometimes "serve me well", as I may stumble across more accurate ideas (or refine the ones I already have) since I'm always open to search and learn more. However, it is often difficult, since it often leads me to doubt my own capabilities to get things done in the "practical world", get more involved, and achieve worthwhile goals! This might explain why I haven't accomplished much in my life yet, such as getting published. Almost exactly thirty years ago though, I had found ways to disprove Relativity, and other popular theoretical physics theories. I'm currently in the process of writing a book, or several essays, that involve subjects such as light, gravity, time, space, particles, mass, energy, and inertia.
 
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Welcome to PF. :smile:

Quest Ion said:
This might explain why I haven't accomplished much in my life yet, such as getting published.
Please re-read the PF rules (under INFO at the top of the page). We do not allow personal speculation/theories to be discussed here until they are published in the peer-reviewed literature. Have a nice day. :smile:
 
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Hi. Thanks. I was actually just trying to find a way to join this group, and I had to write something. :) How much may I participate in discussions here? What questions seem unacceptable?
 
  • #4
I wanted to say this. My main reason for wanting to join is to present an idea of how to test certain effects of today's eclipse on the pendulum. It is said (by some individuals) that a pendulum under a complete solar eclipse "swings wildly". According to some trusted sources, there admittedly isn't much documented theory or knowledge available that explains the effect. Actually, quite a few have expressed that the effect doesn't exist at all! Today's the perfect opportunity to test the eclipse, and even if it's cloudy, the experiment would almost certainly continue to work! Then again, the electricity in the upper atmosphere might have a degree of influence itself! :)
 
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Hi. This is the same letter that I've already sent to quite a few individuals.

I heard the other day that there is a solar eclipse on October 14th in the United States
that is visible from Oregon to Texas. I don't know if this is something that interests you,
though I thought I'd run a few ideas by you.

There is something I heard of a few years ago that I'm quite fascinated with.
It is said that when there is a solar eclipse, a pendulum underneath experiences
an unusual effect, where it "swings all about wildly". This effect of the "shaky"
pendulum is called the "Allais effect".

I wish I had known of this effect when a solar eclipse was visible in Nashville a few years ago!
It is said that there is a solar eclipse somewhere in the world approximately every 18 months.
So eventually I want to travel wherever I can to experiment with them! So I had some thoughts and questions of how to test this unusual phenomenon, and
a few ideas with which to possibly perform an experiment

How would a pendulum act through an eclipse if it were set up underneath a lead square?
or within a lead box? (I say specifically "lead" since some waves within the electromagnetic
spectrum have trouble going through lead.) Would this stop or slow down the wild "swings"
of the pendulum? Could you tell if whatever causes the "shaky" effect emanates directly
and straightforwardly from the eclipse in the sky, or is it possibly "all around" and maybe
detectable (also) through a sideways trajectory, if the lead square covered the pendulum? Also, what if it were possible to directly study how this unusual effect works? What if
a "network" of small lights or even lasers were put into place, while someone sprays
an aerosol liquid to possibly show what's hidden within the invisible field, to detect the
course of electromagnetism or gravity that it "follows" to form patterns, similar to the
way metal slivers on a piece of paper with a magnet underneath shows the intricate
design that the magnetic field generates. Is the interference within the vicinity of a pendulum through an eclipse caused by the absence,
or instead a surplus, of gravity or electromagnetism? Or they possibly alternate between each
of them? Is more gravity propagated by the presence of the moon combined with the sun, or is
it less gravity, since the moon is in the way and much of the sun's gravity doesn't reach the earth?


Maybe a heavy lead square or box isn't even necessary to study the Allais effect.
Is it possible that the Allais effect is observable, or even preventable, within a house? How much to anyone's knowledge has this unusual pendulum effect already been experimented
with? Would you possibly know anyone in your area there who might have interest in testing this effect?

Anyway, have a fine day!
 
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