Questions before moving into an apartment?

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  • #26
Moonbear
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I'm in a dorm room at the moment. It's good that the kitchen is separate so the room dosen't get stuffy. Have you lived in a place where the kitchen is in the same room as the bed and study desk? In other words, have you lived in a studio?

The studio is furnished and what's more it's actually a little 'house' at the back of a couple's house. They've got young kids just like you described, not too young as I saw a bike with training wheels. So no one to share the walls with. However, if the couple or kids go into the garden then noise can be heard.
I haven't lived in a studio, but my boyfriend has what's called a studio in NYC (the kitchen is somewhat separate, but is open into the other room). I haven't noticed any problem. My first apartment had a separate kitchen, but there were no doors between rooms except the bedroom (which I kept open anyway), and it wasn't a problem either.

If you're worried about it becoming "stuffy," two things to look for are the windows (opening a window will really help air the place out...even if sounds from outside bother you, you can leave it open a crack whenever you're out for a little while), and the vent fan...open the cabinet above the stove. If there is a duct there leading out somewhere, your vent fan is properly vented. If there is no duct in that cabinet, it's one of those weird, recycling fans that just filters stuff, but doesn't really vent it out. You want a kitchen fan that vents outside.

You're not going to find anyplace more silent than what you're describing though. Even with your own house, there are neighbors or kids playing in the yards, people's dogs barking, etc. If you find these noises very distracting when studying, you might want to just use earplugs to muffle the sound. At least you know you won't be disrupted from sleeping at night (I don't like wearing earplugs at night, since it's not comfortable for me to sleep and I worry about not hearing the alarm in the morning).
 
  • #27
Evo
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I live in an apartment now and was afraid to because of noise. This complex has units at staggered levels so that there is very little shared wall space. The residents are older, wealthier and completely silent.

It's probably beyond what you could afford, but try renting a house from an elderly couple if you are the quiet type and can convince them you won't destroy the place.
 
  • #28
tgt
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I haven't lived in a studio, but my boyfriend has what's called a studio in NYC (the kitchen is somewhat separate, but is open into the other room). I haven't noticed any problem. My first apartment had a separate kitchen, but there were no doors between rooms except the bedroom (which I kept open anyway), and it wasn't a problem either.

If you're worried about it becoming "stuffy," two things to look for are the windows (opening a window will really help air the place out...even if sounds from outside bother you, you can leave it open a crack whenever you're out for a little while), and the vent fan...open the cabinet above the stove. If there is a duct there leading out somewhere, your vent fan is properly vented. If there is no duct in that cabinet, it's one of those weird, recycling fans that just filters stuff, but doesn't really vent it out. You want a kitchen fan that vents outside.

You're not going to find anyplace more silent than what you're describing though. Even with your own house, there are neighbors or kids playing in the yards, people's dogs barking, etc. If you find these noises very distracting when studying, you might want to just use earplugs to muffle the sound. At least you know you won't be disrupted from sleeping at night (I don't like wearing earplugs at night, since it's not comfortable for me to sleep and I worry about not hearing the alarm in the morning).
ear plugs don't work unfortuntely. I even have Hush muffs and they don't work either. Sure, the block the sound and will prevent ear damage but for compelte sound block, it dosen't work. The sound travels not just via the ear but throat and other openings. Sound is vibration so it can travel through your chest and you can always feel it. Unfortunte but that's the way it is.

What sort of things did you cook that made it so less in 'pollution'? Not much frying?
 
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  • #29
tgt
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I live in an apartment now and was afraid to because of noise. This complex has units at staggered levels so that there is very little shared wall space. The residents are older, wealthier and completely silent.

It's probably beyond what you could afford, but try renting a house from an elderly couple if you are the quiet type and can convince them you won't destroy the place.
There was a really nice house with a 75 year old woman but unfortuntely it is on a street with many cars passing by. The studio I described is in a lane, in a street so can't get much better then that.
 
  • #30
tgt
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The good thing about living in a dormatry the social aspect which may seem irritating at first from noisey neighbours but can actually be good. The other thing is I've got a lifetime to live by myself but only a limited number of years living as a student in a dormatry so should actually cherish it, strange as it may seem.
 
  • #31
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This new place has a young couple as neighbours on the other side of the fence. I heard a young child scream during an inspection. Is that something to be mindful of?

What do you people think of knocking on their door and asking them if they are quiet or not? They might think it a stupid question and think I'm a bit rude?
 
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  • #32
Moonbear
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It would be rude. You're not going to get rid of every noise, and a child playing isn't that much of a noise. If you're THAT sensitive to noise, you better work on getting used to it, because there is no place that is going to be totally silent all the time. Even a house out in the middle of nowhere will have birds or crickets chirping. Try being realistic.
 
  • #33
tgt
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It would be rude. You're not going to get rid of every noise, and a child playing isn't that much of a noise. If you're THAT sensitive to noise, you better work on getting used to it, because there is no place that is going to be totally silent all the time. Even a house out in the middle of nowhere will have birds or crickets chirping. Try being realistic.
The child was shouting actually. Probably a bit spoiled. I don't mind noise from birds actually.
 
  • #34
JasonRox
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:rofl: That reminds me of the sofa my aunt used to have! It was great fun as a kid, and I thought it was the best couch ever. :biggrin: My grandmother didn't agree, and everytime we all visited, would need someone to pull her out! :rofl:


:yuck: I think I'd want to have my own mattress. That, or get a really thick mattress pad to put between you and the mattress. I've never lived in a furnished apartment, so didn't even think about that!
You can just put a foam pad over the mattress if you currently can't afford a mattress at the beginning of the lease.
 
  • #35
Evo
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The child was shouting actually. Probably a bit spoiled. I don't mind noise from birds actually.
Noisy kids. NO!!!! Problamatic children and whimpy parents can be an absolute nightmare.
 
  • #36
tgt
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Noisy kids. NO!!!! Problamatic children and whimpy parents can be an absolute nightmare.
I guess as well. I went over there at a random day in the evening and heard the kid shouting constantly. Later on, the mum came out and started talking on the phone in the garden. I think I'm going to delcine that place.

It looks like observing your neighbours is an essential part of the process.
 
  • #37
Moonbear
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I guess as well. I went over there at a random day in the evening and heard the kid shouting constantly. Later on, the mum came out and started talking on the phone in the garden. I think I'm going to delcine that place.

It looks like observing your neighbours is an essential part of the process.
Oh, I see, not just a kid playing out in the yard, but screaming into the evening when normal kids should be inside eating dinner or heading off to bed...and yeah, if you could hear the kid's mom talking on the phone in the yard from the apartment, she must be awfully loud. Ugh. Good you noticed that before moving in.
 
  • #38
JasonRox
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I'll probably live with students until I'm like 30. Some students are bad and messy, but overall it's manageable. Plus, much cheaper than renting an apartment!

I don't mine people talking so much. It's more like annoying laughs, and machine noises (like laundry machines).
 

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