Reference to a peer reviewed paper

Hello

I am new to this forum and I just wanted to post about a paper that I found in Physical Review Letters. It is in Volume 90, number 20, 201102 (2003). It is titled "Traversable Wormholes with Arbitrarily Small Energy Condition Violations", by Matt Visser et al.

In this paper, it is shown mathematically that wormholes can be made with very small violations of the Averaged Null Energy Condition. My question is, is the Casimir Effect a violation of the Averaged Null Energy Condition? As shown in another paper:

A `warp drive' with more reasonable total energy requirements
Chris Van Den Broeck
Class. Quantum Grav. 16 No 12 (December 1999) 3973-3979

on page 3974, the Casimir Effect is a violation of the Weak Energy Condition.

I was just bringing this up because it would seem like an overlooked profound discovery to make working wormholes with today's technology (the Casimir Effect), even if the wormhole was only big enough to let say photons through. It would still be a method for instant interstellar communication if only photons could pass through.
 

DrClaude

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I am new to this forum and I just wanted to post about a paper that I found in Physical Review Letters. It is in Volume 90, number 20, 201102 (2003). It is titled "Traversable Wormholes with Arbitrarily Small Energy Condition Violations", by Matt Visser et al.
Proper link: https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.90.201102

A `warp drive' with more reasonable total energy requirements
Chris Van Den Broeck
Class. Quantum Grav. 16 No 12 (December 1999) 3973-3979
Proper link: https://doi.org/10.1088/0264-9381/16/12/314
 

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