Refrigeration Heat Exchanger Design (Evaporator and Condenser)

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Hi There

Based on a Vapour compression refrigeration system:
Does anyone out there know a good estimate or any real values for the total heat transfer area for the hot and cold sides of a domestic refrigeration system? i.e. the sum of the areas of the evaporator and the condenser.

For the Evaporator:
QL=UL.AL.(TL-T1)

AL=heat transfer area of cold side (Low side)=????
UL=overal heat trans. coefficient of cold side.=????
QL=heat removed from cold side = 7.93 KW
TL=refrigerator temp. = 3degs C + 273.15=276.12 Kelvin
T1= Refrigerant evaporating temp. =0degs C + 273.15= 273.15 Kelvin

I am trying to estimate this area so I can calculate the overal heat transfer coefficient which I need for other calculations. So far the outcome of estimating the area and finding the heat transfer coefficient based on it has not been realistic.

If it helps:
The aim of my project is to find the optimal heat transfer ratio between hot and cold side, there is theory on this which I am following, I just need some realistic values for area and heat transfer coefficient. I think it is more logical to estimate the area and find the h.t. coefficient based on that rather than the other way around.
 
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Normally evaporators have some kind of fins (maybe just a plate that evaporator tubes are pressed into) as the resistance on the air side is much greater than that of the refrigerant to heat exchanger side.
 

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