Rigid Body Rotation Application

  • Thread starter lanew
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  • #1
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Homework Statement


I'm trying to include rigid body rotation in a problem I'm working on but can't seem to figure it out.

Two shafts oriented vertically are connected by a thin cross member of length [itex]R[/itex]. Holding one shaft stationary and applying a constant tangential load [itex]F[/itex] to the other shaft will cause rotation at some speed [itex]\omega[/itex]. Given the mass [itex]m[/itex] and moment of inertia [itex]I_z[/itex]. Is it possible to calculate the angular velocity?

Homework Equations


Not sure what we need, but I believe it's going to involve energy.
[itex]K_{rot}=\frac{1}{2}I_z\omega^2[/itex]
Other than that I'm not sure.

The Attempt at a Solution


No idea. I've been thinking about the problem for the past couple days but can't figure out how to determine the angular velocity given only these variables. If needed I may be able to supply other variables (this is a overly simplified example to give you an idea of the problem).

Thanks.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
ehild
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I have no idea about this problem without a picture...


ehild
 
  • #4
ehild
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Applying that constant tangential force F means constant torque (τ=R*F) with respect to the fixed axis and constant angular acceleration: β=τ/I, where I is the moment of inertia, again with respect to he fixed axis. The angular velocity will change with time.

ehild
 

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