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Rocket Scientist are not as smart as previously thought!

  1. Sep 23, 2006 #1
    yahoo news

    I guess Rocket science is easier then it looks
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2006
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 23, 2006 #2

    Curious3141

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    It's all in good humor.
     
  4. Sep 23, 2006 #3

    Gokul43201

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    I made the NASA error yesterday when I was transfering helium into the crystat - did my calculation in inches and looked up the centimeter chart instead. It was about 5 minutes and about 10 liters of lost helium before I figured I had the wrong units!
     
  5. Sep 23, 2006 #4
    Was it 5 minutes twiddling your thumbs then going whoops I made a mistake. or was it 5 minutes of "What the hell is going on? Did any of you guys touch this? Damn, I hope I didn't break something."?
     
  6. Sep 23, 2006 #5
    Well of course it's humor do you think anyone is going to take this seriously:
     
  7. Sep 23, 2006 #6

    Gokul43201

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    It was like this:
    "Hmm...why don't I have enough pressure in the dewar yet...maybe it's because the flow is a little low...let's give it a minute...hmmm...(twiddle twiddle)...I don't like the look of this...I'm going to turn up the flow a bit...hmmm...still nothing...this makes no sense...let's remeasure the position of the transfer stick...okay it's the right number but it looks a little high... something's wrong...wait...did I...was it...is that. . . supposed to be. . . CENTIMETERS!!!" :surprised
     
  8. Sep 23, 2006 #7
    I do everything in tenths and hundredths of a foot, and quite often read the inches side of the tapemeasure. and a tenth of a foot is close enough to an inch that the mistake is easy to overlook, but far enough away to be able to really cause problems if it isn't caught. I can usually blame any damage on the illegal alien laborers though, so it all works out.
     
  9. Sep 23, 2006 #8
    then 1 minute of acting like nothing is wrong and hoping no one else saw the bonehead move?
     
  10. Sep 23, 2006 #9

    Curious3141

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    Yes, but there was nothing in your post to show *you* knew it was tongue-in-cheek. For future reference, a smiley (like :rofl: or :biggrin: ) would be helpful.
     
  11. Sep 23, 2006 #10
    I wanted to see if any one would take this seorisly. I toke it seorisly when I first read it but then It was obvisouly a joke and saw it the humor section.
     
  12. Sep 23, 2006 #11

    Gokul43201

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    Couldn't pull that off after all the high decibel cursing!
     
  13. Sep 23, 2006 #12

    Curious3141

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    Yeah, I got thrown a little too. :smile:
     
  14. Sep 23, 2006 #13
    high decibel and high pitched? (helium)
    I've learned onw or two things here over the years, but the one thing that sticks out more than anything else is about helium. I had always wondered how we were able to get helium to fill our balloons. Since it is a gas that floats away, out of reach. And a noble gas at that, so we couldn't be breaking up helium compounds. And fusion technology just wasn't panning out. So I asked about it here and I've never forgotten how neat the answer was and I feel smarter and happier knowing it. I hear the bullfrogs all the time, but had never known that they use helium to blow up their throats when they croak and that "milking" was the only way to harvest it.
     
  15. Sep 23, 2006 #14

    Moonbear

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    :rofl: Having done brain surgery, I usually joke "It's not like it's rocket science." But I think both are prone to the same errors...why can't they make a metric ruler that does NOT have inches on the other side? I can't count how many times I've carefully gotten everything lined up on x-rays, got the ruler perfectly squared up to measure distances to target sites, and then realized I was holding it the wrong way and about to measure in inches. :grumpy:
     
  16. Sep 23, 2006 #15

    Gokul43201

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    Didn't know that!

    But I happen to know this little tidbit about sounds. Most animals can determine the direction of source of a sound only when the sounds waves are close to sinusoidal. With square waves, it's essentially impossible for the human ear to discern a bearing. The chirping (or whatever the sound is called) of crickets is almost a pure square wave (presumably evolved as a defense mechanism) which is what makes it seem like they're all around you when you hear them.
     
  17. Sep 24, 2006 #16
    Yeah, but who ever heard of milking a cricket? that's just crazy.

    I do have a cricket story though and I'd be happy to share it with everyone.
    It's true you can't track a cricket by sound, but I have seen a cricket chirp lead directly to it's untimely death and to a nearly broken finger for me. I was reclining on a La-Z-Boy chair once and slowly drifted off to sleep. The sound of a cricket chirping woke me up and I opened my eyes to see the cricket sitting on my chest with those long antennae creeping forward to sample my lips and chin. I panic'd and swept the bug off my chest with such force that it was knocked out against the wall and my follow through nearly broke my hand against a lamp.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2006
  18. Sep 24, 2006 #17

    Moonbear

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    Have you ever considered that they really ARE all around you?! At least around here, I don't need echolocation to find them, I can see the buggers hopping everywhere! :bugeye:

    Haven't had any problem finding the ones that get into the house either...the problem I have is that just as I start to get close, they stop chirping...until I walk away again and start to get comfortable. :grumpy: There's one in the garage that's driving me batty! (Wait, maybe I need a bat to solve the problem. :devil:) I sit in my living room, and can hear the chirp coming up the stairwell to the ground floor, follow it all the way to the door to the garage, open the door, and suddenly....silence. :cry: Ember seems completely uninterested in chasing them out either. Useless kitten! :grumpy: One was sitting on the stairs heading for the top floor, where my bedroom is, and I tried to point it out to Ember, and the little brat decided to try attacking my finger while the cricket happily hopped away. :mad:
     
  19. Sep 24, 2006 #18
    don't try to point things out to a cat. next time just throw the cat at the cricket.
     
  20. Sep 24, 2006 #19
    They still use those?
     
  21. Sep 24, 2006 #20
    Flying sex pest silences the crickets
    If only there was such a pest for human females... Imagine 9 tenths of them going mute... :rolleyes:
     
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