Self-Testing on a PC running Win 10

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I checked the BIOS and fan cooling is enabled. What else can I check out for? I want to avoid lengthening the thread to much. Can anyone let me know if there is anything else specifically in the BIOS to look out for?
I've asked twice before whether your BIOS tells you the CPU temperature, not whether fan cooling was enabled. Yes? No?

If the BIOS gives you the CPU temp, run the computer for a while, and see if the CPU gets hot. You might need to do some research on the processor and see what is an acceptable max. temperature.

Don't worry about lengthening the thread, but do pay attention to what people are suggesting, such as you or somebody checking out the power supply.
 
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  • #27
WWGD
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Thank you all and sorry for delay in following up. I checked out the BIOS and the feature " Fan Always On" was enabled. I have read, heard that motherboards from HP (my PC brand) do not age well. I bought it on 2015, so that may explain it. I may just store everything on a flash drive and get a new one.

EDIT: Here is (part of the ) output of the self-repair process; the srttrail.txt :

Startup Repair diagnosis and repair log
---------------------------
Number of repair attempts: 1

Session details
---------------------------
System Disk = \Device\Harddisk0
Windows directory = C:\WINDOWS
AutoChk Run = 0
Number of root causes = 1

Test Performed:
---------------------------
Name: Check for updates
Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0
Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:
---------------------------
Name: System disk test
Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0
Time taken = 16 ms

Test Performed:
---------------------------
Name: Disk failure diagnosis
Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0
Time taken = 250 ms

Test Performed:
---------------------------
Name: Disk metadata test
Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0
Time taken = 3594 ms

Test Performed:
---------------------------
Name: Disk metadata test
Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0
Time taken = 78 ms

Test Performed:
---------------------------
Name: Target OS test
Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0
Time taken = 390 ms

Test Performed:
---------------------------
Name: Volume content check
Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0
Time taken = 1141 ms

Test Performed:
---------------------------
Name: Boot manager diagnosis
Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0
Time taken = 0 ms

Test Performed:
---------------------------
Name: System boot log diagnosis
Result: Completed successfully. Error code = 0x0
Time taken = 62 ms

Root cause found:
---------------------------
Boot critical file c:\efi\microsoft\boot\resources\custom\bootres.dll is corrupt.

Repair action: File repair
Result: Failed. Error code = 0x57
Time taken = 7406 ms

---------------------------
---------------------------
 
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  • #28
WWGD
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I have a few more output files if these can be helpful:
1)bootfailure.txt
2)bootstat.dat ( what do you open a .dat with? Dis or dat ? ;).
3)Diagnosticlayout.txt
4)bcdinfo.txt
5)Srttrail.txt
Please let me know
 
  • #29
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2)bootstat.dat ( what do you open a .dat with? Dis or dat ? ;).
Notepad or any other text editor...
 
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WWGD
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Notepad or any other text editor...
Came out pretty jumbled with notepad : @K›ç3~èŠÅë”Kab/
 
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jim hardy
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Do you own a Mac, or do you use Linux?
Neither . I would like to learn to use Linux but haven't made that plunge.
Still running an old Asusz laptop i bought in 2012 with Windows 7

It's somewhat of a comfortable old jalopy now, like Hans Solo's Millenium Falcon.

old jim
 
  • #35
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I have a few more output files if these can be helpful:
1)bootfailure.txt
2)bootstat.dat ( what do you open a .dat with? Dis or dat ? ;).
3)Diagnosticlayout.txt
4)bcdinfo.txt
5)Srttrail.txt
Please let me know
None of these is likely to be helpful if the problem is a bad or intermittent power supply. I think you said earlier that you were going to take it to have somebody look at the computer, and particularly the power supply. If that is the problem, none of the Windows diagnostics test are going to tell you anything useful.
Came out pretty jumbled with notepad : @K›ç3~èŠÅë”Kab/
It is likely a binary file, not meant to be human readable, but instead to be input data to some other program.
I did a search for "what is bootstat.dat" and this is the first thing that came up:
According to Bleeping Computer, bootstat.dat is a Windows system log file that allows the computer to determine if the last boot was successful or not. Since this file is part of the Windows system itself, it should not be interacted with by normal users and you should simply leave it alone.
As I understand it, the problem is all the kludges Minisoft uses to be able to be all things to all people.
If you're talking about the fact that the .dat file was unreadable, see the above. It's a fact that Microsoft pulls some lulus from time to time (e.g., Windows Vista and IMO, Windows 8), but Windows didn't scramble that file.
 
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I have read, heard that motherboards from HP (my PC brand) do not age well. I bought it on 2015, so that may explain it.
And you said earlier, that it was used when you bought it. Do you have any idea when it was manufactured?

Regarding motherboard lifespan, I don't know if there are problems with longevity of HP laptop motherboards, but I don't think this is true of the desktop computers. The computer I'm using right now is an HP Pavilion that I bought in 2013. I have had exactly zero trouble with it, and I use it pretty heavily.
 
  • #37
WWGD
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And you said earlier, that it was used when you bought it. Do you have any idea when it was manufactured?

Regarding motherboard lifespan, I don't know if there are problems with longevity of HP laptop motherboards, but I don't think this is true of the desktop computers. The computer I'm using right now is an HP Pavilion that I bought in 2013. I have had exactly zero trouble with it, and I use it pretty heavily.
Yes, my bad, I had considered trying in a new battery , but I have been running around too much. But I need internet but I don't have access at home ( using phone as hotspot creates a new set of problems) so a desktop is not a viable option now. Thanks for your patience, follow-up.
 
  • #38
jim hardy
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Root cause found:
---------------------------
Boot critical file c:\efi\microsoft\boot\resources\custom\bootres.dll is corrupt.
I'd search on "corrupted bootres.dll" and see how other folks have fixed it.

My computer finds mine via the search bar, then click "Properties"
upload_2019-3-7_15-36-52.png



and says it's not been modified since the Big Bang.
and clicking "Security" reports that only a 'trusted installer' has permission to write to it. Even System is blocked.

So if yours is corrupted
i'd suspect either malware or disk hardware error .

Maybe your local computer gurus could find an uncorrupted version and replace it ??

old jim
 

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Boot critical file c:\efi\microsoft\boot\resources\custom\bootres.dll is corrupt.
Sorry, I missed this line from back in post #27. That was a fairly long list, and I didn't read it carefully.

I'd search on "corrupted bootres.dll" and see how other folks have fixed it.
That's a good idea.

So if yours is corrupted
i'd suspect either malware or disk hardware error .

Maybe your local computer gurus could find an uncorrupted version and replace it ??
I found this Microsoft site -- https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us...otresdll/1f44a1c7-2857-474f-8a7a-7eb01a86e005 -- which has a number of good suggestions, one of which is to reinstall the OS. Replacing bootres.dll seems to be a pretty dicey operation -- the replacement needs to be the same version as the one it's replacing, according to the page I linked to.

Here's a link to a page that describes doing a repair upgrade to Win10 -- https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us...-windows/35160fbe-9352-4e70-9887-f40096ec3085
 
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jim hardy
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Sounds worth a try.

Worst it can do is make the machine into a bookend.

My last resort
terminated-jpg.jpg
 

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"My last resort "

Yup, that's the fix for when 'Ctrl-Alt-Del' just won't cut it......
 
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jim hardy
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Yup, that's the fix for when 'Ctrl-Alt-Del' just won't cut it......
Yup. Nemesis has her following...
 
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  • #43
CWatters
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That keyboard is actually flat, it's just designed like that to stop you typing too fast.
 
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To determine whether it's a hardware problem, you might try booting from a source other than the internal HDD, e.g. a CD or a USB drive -- if you continue to encounter the symptom you described, that pretty much rules out the OS.

Regarding the problem as described, I would suspect power supply, RAM, overheating, or maybe a bad power or reset switch.

You can use a free monitoring toolset such as (e.g) cpu-z (https://www.cpuid.com/downloads/cpu-z/cpu-z_1.87-en.zip) or hwinfo (https://www.hwinfo.com/files/hwi_602.zip) to check the temps.
 
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