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Math Should I get a B.S. degree in math?

  1. Jul 31, 2011 #1
    I'm an engineering physics major at a mexican university (ITESM) with good school grades (98 out of 100). I want to know if I should get a B.S. degree in math in an american university (probably from a top 10 math university) before I go for a PhD. in physics. I am interested in optics, condensed matter physics and mathematical physics.

    If you have time enough, could you please check out these webpage?
    https://serviciosva.itesm.mx/PlanesEstudio/Consultas/Planes/ConsultaPlanEstudio.aspx?form=PLANESTUDIO&contenido=caratula&modovista=area&Idioma=ING&claveprograma=IFI11&UnaCol=NO&VerReq=&VerEqui [Broken]

    Those are the courses I will be taking. Would that be enough to go straight into grad school physics in a top 10 physics american university?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 31, 2011 #2

    Pengwuino

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    Why would you get a BS in math if it sounds like you're already going to get a bachelors in engineering physics? You pretty much have the curriculum required for an actual physics degree so entering into a physics grad school would be easy for you.

    Although, as stated on other threads, there really is no such thing as "top 10 physics schools". You need to pick a school based on your interest and who is doing what.
     
  4. Jul 31, 2011 #3
    I was thinking on applying for a B.S. in math after I'm done with engineering physics because I've read in other threads that knowledge of differential geometry, modern algebra, topology, complex analysis, etc. are useful in most physics branches. Do you think it's enough though with calculus, diff. equations, linear algebra, and whatever I could grasp of the other math subjects with self-study?
     
  5. Jul 31, 2011 #4

    Pengwuino

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    Yah you'll probably want to gather the math skills on the way. Not take an entire degree in it as a lot of it won't be applicable to what you do in physics.
     
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