Should I take Calc III (multi-variable) in high school?

In summary: Thanks for the advice!In summary, taking Calc III at a separate college may be a worth wild choice (the credits could transfer to Purdue). However, you need to have a good background in Euclidean Geometry and a good understanding of basic calculus before attempting it.
  • #1
rebat
9
0
I am currently enrolled in Calculus AB and am going to take the Calculus BC exam. I taught myself most topics in single variable calc over the summer so I am very confident that I can pass the BC exam.

Provided I do, I would have the opportunity the take Calc III (and possibly partial diff equations) at a satellite college in my city. If I am wanting to go to Purdue University and enroll in their physics honors program and mathematics program. Is taking Calc III at a separate college a worth wild choice (the credits could transfer to Purdue)? I have heard conflicting opinions. Will it make my application stand out in a good way compared to others?

Thanks!
 
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  • #2
I would go for it.
As for the partial differential equations, you need ordinary differential equations first as you constantly use them in PDEs.

Good luck!

P.S. Calc BC covers taylor series, power series, infinite sums, improper integrals, trig subs, etc. so make sure you review these topics before the exam (since you're in calc AB you won't be reviewing those topics in class)
 
  • #3
rebat said:
I am currently enrolled in Calculus AB and am going to take the Calculus BC exam. I taught myself most topics in single variable calc over the summer so I am very confident that I can pass the BC exam.

Provided I do, I would have the opportunity the take Calc III (and possibly partial diff equations) at a satellite college in my city. If I am wanting to go to Purdue University and enroll in their physics honors program and mathematics program. Is taking Calc III at a separate college a worth wild choice (the credits could transfer to Purdue)? I have heard conflicting opinions. Will it make my application stand out in a good way compared to others?

Thanks!

Hey rebat and welcome to the forums.

Do you have a good background on basic Euclidean Geometry?

Also I think for PDE's as another posted suggested, you should do a normal DE course first before you do PDE's.

With regards to honors courses, most that I have seen often start with Multivariable calculus and linear algebra in their first year and don't expect the students to have done the multivariable stuff before (they expect that they have a solid single variable calculus history though).

It's more important that you learn the stuff properly rather than quickly. Math has a habit of taking a little while to settle in the mind before you really understand it and this becomes more evident as you go up the abstraction food chain.

I guess though if you feel confident, you could take it and if you get credit, then you could substitute that course for another math or other course, but if I was to give advice I would say to wait until you get into an honors program and take it from that professor especially if they have a separate course for honors students, since the benefit will be having a professor that will give you more insight and who will push you that little bit more as well as having other students with similar traits to yourself in your class: that is the real benefit of being in an honors class: it is not the material per se, it is the other things like the environment that make it good for the students.
 
  • #4
PDEs sounds a bit advanced. You definitely want to do regular DEs first.

It's more important that you learn the stuff properly rather than quickly.
ditto 100%

As for Multivariable, I'd say that if you want to be a mathematician, a good base of rigorous calculus from a book like apostol could be good. However I don't think you'll have any trouble in multivariable. If you want to learn the math, go for it. You can always place out of the Purdue course if you want.
 
  • #5
chiro said:
Hey rebat and welcome to the forums.
Thanks!
chiro said:
Also I think for PDE's as another posted suggested, you should do a normal DE course first before you do PDE's.
Ok, I may have got there courses mixed up :redface:
chiro said:
but if I was to give advice I would say to wait until you get into an honors program and take it from that professor especially if they have a separate course for honors students, since the benefit will be having a professor that will give you more insight and who will push you that little bit more as well as having other students with similar traits to yourself in your class: that is the real benefit of being in an honors class: it is not the material per se, it is the other things like the environment that make it good for the students.
Thats probably what I will do; I will take the classes in high school but retake them in the honors program(the classes at the satalite are cheap :!)).

Thanks for the advice!
 

1. Should I take Calc III in high school if I am interested in pursuing a career in STEM?

Yes, taking Calc III in high school can provide a strong foundation for future studies in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. It covers advanced concepts such as multivariable calculus, vector calculus, and partial derivatives that are important in many STEM disciplines.

2. Is it beneficial to take Calc III in high school if I plan on majoring in a non-STEM subject?

While Calc III may not be directly applicable to non-STEM majors, it can still provide valuable problem-solving and critical thinking skills that are transferable to other fields. Additionally, many colleges and universities view advanced math courses favorably and it can help strengthen your college application.

3. What is the difference between Calc III and Calc II in high school?

Calc III, also known as multivariable calculus, builds upon the concepts learned in Calc II and introduces new topics such as vector calculus and partial derivatives. It also covers three-dimensional space and applications of calculus to real-world problems. Calc II, on the other hand, focuses on integration techniques and applications of integration.

4. Are there any prerequisites for taking Calc III in high school?

Most high schools require students to have completed Calc II before taking Calc III. It is also recommended to have a strong understanding of algebra, trigonometry, and geometry as these are foundational concepts in calculus.

5. Will taking Calc III in high school give me college credit?

This depends on the high school and the college you plan on attending. Some high schools offer Advanced Placement (AP) or dual enrollment courses in Calc III, which can count for college credit if you pass the corresponding exams. However, it is important to check with your high school and potential colleges to see if they accept these credits.

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