Silicon and Germanium semiconductor mixtures used in component manufacturing?

In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of using a mixture of silicon and germanium semiconductors with other chemical elements to create robust electronic components. The specific elements added are not mentioned, but possibilities could include gallium and arsenide. The question of whether this mixture could assist in quantum computing is also raised, and it is suggested that a thorough understanding of semiconductor devices and quantum mechanics is necessary to explore this possibility.
  • #1
akerkarprashant
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TL;DR Summary
Si + Ge + ? + ? =
Can Silicon and Germanium semiconductors mixture (chemical reaction) with some other chemical elements (if required) assist in creating new and existing robust electronic components?

Si + Ge + ? + ? =

Can this assist in quantum computing?
 

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  • #2
Mentor note: Changed the level from "A" to none.
You indicated an A (Advanced) level for this post, indicating that you are at a post-graduate level or beyond. You should have a good idea how semiconductor devices work. What other elements are routinely added? What do you think the answers to your questions are?
 
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  • #3
Possible other elements could be gallium, arsenide etc.
 
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Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar
 
  • #5
I am guessing from your reply that you have no significant background in either semiconductors or quantum theory. I suggest you start by reading the Wikipedia article Semiconductor, and then following the links it contains to the relevant sub-topics (Doping, e.g.). There are many online references as well, or you can pick up an inexpensive used copy of this excellent textbook: Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices.

To understand quantum computing, you need a solid course in quantum mechanics. You might check out the offerings from MIT Open Courseware.
 
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1. What are silicon and germanium semiconductor mixtures used for in component manufacturing?

Silicon and germanium semiconductor mixtures are used to create electronic components such as transistors, diodes, and integrated circuits. These components are essential for the functioning of electronic devices like computers, smartphones, and televisions.

2. What are the main differences between silicon and germanium semiconductors?

Silicon and germanium are both semiconductors, meaning they have properties of both conductors and insulators. However, silicon is the most widely used semiconductor due to its abundance, stability, and compatibility with other materials. Germanium, on the other hand, is less commonly used due to its higher cost and lower stability.

3. How are silicon and germanium semiconductor mixtures made?

Silicon and germanium semiconductor mixtures are made through a process called doping, where impurities are intentionally added to the pure semiconductor material to alter its electrical properties. For example, adding boron to silicon creates a p-type semiconductor, while adding phosphorus creates an n-type semiconductor.

4. What are the advantages of using a silicon and germanium semiconductor mixture?

The combination of silicon and germanium in a semiconductor mixture can provide the benefits of both materials. For example, germanium has a higher carrier mobility, making it better for high-frequency applications, while silicon has a higher breakdown voltage, making it more suitable for high-power applications. Together, they can create a semiconductor with improved overall performance.

5. What are some potential applications of silicon and germanium semiconductor mixtures?

Silicon and germanium semiconductor mixtures are used in a wide range of applications, including computer processors, solar cells, LEDs, and sensors. They are also being researched for use in quantum computing and other emerging technologies.

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