Simple Harmonic Motion Experiment Problem

In summary, the conversation revolves around finding a method to solve for forces and potential energy related to a spring falling from an incline at various angles. The speaker suggests using water and wave harmonics, but the other person is unsure if it is applicable. They also discuss other topics covered in their AP Physics 1 course, such as kinematics, dynamics, circular motion, energy, momentum, simple harmonic motion, torque, rotational motion, and mechanical waves and sound. The speaker raises the concern of friction and suggests finding other ways to provide mechanical advantage.
  • #1
NP04
23
1
Homework Statement
See Image. Part C only
Relevant Equations
Us = 1/2 kx^2
F = kx
Screen Shot 2019-05-07 at 10.45.15 PM.png

I think you could try to solve for the forces based on when the spring falls from an incline at various angles theta, but I am not sure. Or spring potential energy? I'm really confused.

Is there any other method? Could it involve using water and wave harmonics? (We learned waves and sound in conjunction with this unit).

I am in AP Physics 1 and here is the course content we have learned so far (Not including Electrostatics + Circuits because I have minimal understanding of those and I doubt they have any relevance to the problem).

1: Kinematics
2: Dynamics
3: Circular Motion and Gravitation
4: Energy
5: Momentum
6: Simple Harmonic Motion
7: Torque and Rotational Motion
8: Mechanical Waves and Sound

Based on these topics we have covered in class, what other methods could be applicable to this problem?

Thanks in advance.
 
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  • #2
NP04 said:
View attachment 243129
Is there any other method?
Your slope suggestion works by giving the spring some mechanical advantage over gravity, but friction could be a problem. How else can you provide mechanical advantage?
 
  • #3
That stand looks suspiciously like a gallows. I can imagine question b being put in a much more gruesome way...
 

Related to Simple Harmonic Motion Experiment Problem

1. What is simple harmonic motion?

Simple harmonic motion is a type of periodic motion in which an object oscillates back and forth around an equilibrium point with a constant amplitude and period. This type of motion can be seen in many everyday occurrences, such as a swinging pendulum or a vibrating guitar string.

2. How can simple harmonic motion be observed in an experiment?

One way to observe simple harmonic motion in an experiment is by using a mass attached to a spring. As the spring is stretched and released, the mass will oscillate back and forth, displaying the characteristics of simple harmonic motion.

3. What factors affect the period of a simple harmonic motion?

The period of a simple harmonic motion is affected by two main factors: the mass of the object and the stiffness of the spring. A heavier mass or a stiffer spring will result in a longer period, while a lighter mass or a less stiff spring will result in a shorter period.

4. How can the amplitude of a simple harmonic motion be changed in an experiment?

The amplitude of a simple harmonic motion can be changed by altering the initial displacement of the object. A larger initial displacement will result in a larger amplitude, while a smaller initial displacement will result in a smaller amplitude. Additionally, changing the mass or stiffness of the spring can also affect the amplitude of the motion.

5. What is the relationship between simple harmonic motion and energy?

In a simple harmonic motion, the total mechanical energy (the sum of kinetic and potential energy) remains constant. As the object oscillates back and forth, the energy is constantly shifting between kinetic and potential, but the total amount remains the same. This is known as the principle of conservation of energy.

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