Smallest, Cheapest 110VAC -> 20VDC, 10AMP Power Supply

In summary, the conversation discusses the need for a small and affordable power supply for a patent idea. The desired power supply should be 110VAC -> 20VDC, 10AMP and no larger than 5" X 3" X 2". The speaker has not been able to find a suitable option, with a barrier at around 120 watts due to certification requirements. They have two design ideas, with cost being the main differentiating factor. However, patents are not concerned with price and the speaker is advised to focus on describing their idea rather than the precise implementation. The conversation also references a potential patent from the USPO as an example.
  • #1
Magic-Rat
1
0
All,

Well, I have this idea for a patent ... but ... it requires a power supply ... and I can't find one that meets my needs.

I need to come up with the smallest, cheapest 110VAC -> 20VDC, 10AMP (or close to that) power converter (about 190 - 200 Watts), constant voltage.

Small means about 5" X 3" X 2".

Ideally, I would find some commercially available power supply for less than $100 a copy and adapt it ... but, no such luck. I can't find one that size at any price.

There seems to be a barrier at about 120 Watts. This is due (I think) to the U/L certification requirement for 30 cfm air flow (fans) to get any more power than about 120 watts. So, things above 120Watts get a lot bigger (about twice as big in terms of form factor).

But, maybe ... hopefully ... I'm wrong about that.

I have two design ideas and the primary factor that differentiates the two is cost. A small $100 or less unit makes my desired plan the best option. If price is above $100 then I must go to the second option (which allows a bigger power supply but requires lots more cables and other manufucturing ... it's not as good a design ... but it will work).

I dunno.

So ... anybody think of anything??
 
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  • #2
You must realize that if you are using this for a patent application, then whoever answers you is entitled to a share of the profits. (And it won't be me, because I don't know this kind of stuff.)
 
  • #3
Patents are not concerned with price. Also, if this is only a suppoting component (aka. not a critical part of your novel idea) just write your requirements for this secondary device and don't worry about the precise implementation. Your patent only needs to describe your idea. It is not the same as an engineering document/plan. i.e. you don't take a patent to the factory. Took me a long time to figure that out too.

Note This:
http://www.gravitywarpdrive.com/Adobe_pdf_Files/USP_3626606_Orig_Doc.pdf

Not 100% sure this is real but the uspo does know of it. Anyway, hopefully you get the point.
 

1. What is the purpose of a 110VAC -> 20VDC, 10AMP power supply?

A 110VAC -> 20VDC, 10AMP power supply is used to convert alternating current (AC) from a wall outlet into direct current (DC) with a voltage of 20 volts and a maximum output of 10 amps. This type of power supply is commonly used in electronic devices that require a lower voltage and higher amperage input.

2. How does a 110VAC -> 20VDC, 10AMP power supply work?

A 110VAC -> 20VDC, 10AMP power supply works by using a transformer to convert the incoming AC voltage into a lower AC voltage, which is then rectified and filtered to produce a smooth DC output. The output voltage is regulated using various electronic components such as diodes, capacitors, and transistors.

3. What is the difference between AC and DC power?

AC (alternating current) and DC (direct current) are two types of electrical current. AC switches direction periodically, while DC always flows in one direction. Most power outlets in homes and buildings provide AC power, which is suitable for powering appliances and lighting. DC power is commonly used in electronic devices such as computers and mobile phones.

4. Why is it important to have a power supply with the correct voltage and amperage?

Using a power supply with the correct voltage and amperage is important because it ensures that the electronic device receives the appropriate amount of power. If the voltage is too low, the device may not function properly, and if it is too high, it can cause damage to the device. Amperage is also important as it determines how much current the power supply can provide, and if it is not enough, the device may not receive enough power to operate.

5. Are there any safety precautions to consider when using a 110VAC -> 20VDC, 10AMP power supply?

Yes, there are safety precautions that should be taken when using a 110VAC -> 20VDC, 10AMP power supply. It is essential to ensure that the power supply is grounded and that the correct voltage and amperage are being used. It is also important to follow the manufacturer's instructions and not overload the power supply. Additionally, it is recommended to use a surge protector to protect the power supply and connected devices from power surges.

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