So can i become nuclear engineer?

In summary: Is it ok for the freshman year?It is definitely okay to take freshman year of college math. Just make sure to keep up with your homework and you'll be good to go.
  • #1
qwerty68
35
0
Hi,
I'm a student at Vietnam National University, in the partnership program with the France and other country like Switzerland...( called Physique Corpusculaire et Applications ) I'm not a good student. My first year i got only 2.83 for semester 1 and 3.08 for semester 2. I'm not good at physics and math. So anyone can tell me, can i become nuclear engineer? Can a nuclear engineer is not good at physics and math?
Sory for my poor English, because i learn French and other subject in French all the time.
Thank you!
 
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  • #2
Why would you want to become and engineer if you aren't good at math? (Unless you still like it)
 
  • #3
Drakkith said:
Why would you want to become and engineer if you aren't good at math? (Unless you still like it)
You know, I'm not good at math because my IQ is low. So anyone know, that the nuclear engineer can work without the pro skill in math( calucus, algebra) I have finish my freshman year and i will in sophomore year in September. Any way to increase my math skill?
Thank you.
 
  • #4
Practice practice practice!
 
  • #5
Drakkith said:
Practice practice practice!

What kind of math that the nuclear engineer must have? You know, i'am not smart.
 
  • #6
qwerty68 said:
What kind of math that the nuclear engineer must have? You know, i'am not smart.

Try asking in the career guidance forum, they might be able to help you there. I really don't know all the details other than that you obviously need to know basic physics.
 
  • #7
Drakkith said:
Try asking in the career guidance forum, they might be able to help you there. I really don't know all the details other than that you obviously need to know basic physics.

Thank.
 
  • #8
"Any way to increase my math skill?
Thank you."

diligence. keep up with your math homework. work every problem assigned and the others that look interesting. I too am "math challenged" and in college spent 3 hours every night working my math. other courses had to take back seat.
if i took care of math homework everything else seemed easy.

Do not get behind in math homework it is ten times harder to catch up than keep up.

you'll find the reactor physics course a little math intense because it involve fields.
but i managed to get through it so you can too. buckling is buckling, stress in a beam or neutrons in a reactor it's the same equations.if it is your goal to do to work in nuclear power you might consider either mechanical or electrical engineering too. A power plant is a gigantic steam engine with a simple reactor for a heat source. The nuclear part of the reactor works great, it was invented by geniuses and needs little attention. The majority of plant work is in keeping all the pumps, motors, pipes and instruments in good repair. Typically a plant has only a few nuclear engineers but scores of electricals and mechanicals.
In my career the courses that helped most were three phase power, electric machinery, electronic circuits, statics, and reactor operation. Of course freshman physics and math through diffy-Q.
 
  • #9
At my school, we go to Partial Differential Equations and up to Nuclear Physics on a pure side. We learn reactor physics and thermal hydaulics and others that aren't reactor focused. (Your standard radiological side of nuclear.)
 
  • #10
qwerty68 said:
Hi,
I'm a student at Vietnam National University, in the partnership program with the France and other country like Switzerland...( called Physique Corpusculaire et Applications ) I'm not a good student. My first year i got only 2.83 for semester 1 and 3.08 for semester 2. I'm not good at physics and math. So anyone can tell me, can i become nuclear engineer? Can a nuclear engineer is not good at physics and math?
Sory for my poor English, because i learn French and other subject in French all the time.
Thank you!
One must be reasonable proficient in math and physics in order to be an engineer. If one is not good in math, then I'd recommend a degree in the humanities, e.g., public policy.
 
  • #11
Ok, thank everyone. Here are my result in freshman year:
Semester 1:
Internship General Physics: 9/10
French A1: 9.3/10
Mechanics 1: 6.7/10 :(
Algebra: 6.6/10:(
Calculus1: 6.8/10:(
Semester 2:
French A2: 9.5/10
CS1: 9.6/10
Thermodynamics and molecular physics: 7.9/10
Calculus 2: 6.8/10 :(

So it is the end of math general in my university. Next year i have to learn advance math and numerical...

Is it ok for the freshman year?
 
Last edited:

Related to So can i become nuclear engineer?

1. Can I become a nuclear engineer with any undergraduate degree?

No, becoming a nuclear engineer typically requires a Bachelor's degree in engineering or a related field such as physics or mathematics. It is important to have a strong background in math and science before pursuing a career in nuclear engineering.

2. What are the job duties of a nuclear engineer?

Nuclear engineers are responsible for designing, developing, and maintaining nuclear energy systems and technology. This can include tasks such as designing nuclear power plants, developing safety procedures, and monitoring radiation levels.

3. How long does it take to become a nuclear engineer?

Becoming a nuclear engineer typically requires at least a Bachelor's degree, which takes four years to complete. Some individuals may also choose to pursue a Master's or Ph.D. in a specific area of nuclear engineering, which can add an additional 2-4 years to the education process.

4. What skills are important for a nuclear engineer?

Strong analytical and problem-solving skills are crucial for nuclear engineers, as well as attention to detail and the ability to work well in a team. Good communication skills are also important, as nuclear engineers often work with others to design and implement complex systems.

5. Are there any risks associated with working as a nuclear engineer?

Working as a nuclear engineer does come with some risks, as individuals are often exposed to radiation and must follow strict safety protocols. However, with proper training and safety precautions, the risks can be minimized. Additionally, the job outlook for nuclear engineers is currently good, making it a potentially rewarding career choice.

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