Solving a Copper Metal Heat Exchange Problem: Seeking Advice

In summary, the conversation is discussing a problem involving two copper blocks at different temperatures being placed in contact with each other in a perfectly insulating container. The question is asking which amount of heat is exchanged between the two blocks during this process. The conversation also touches on the concepts of specific heat and the difference between heat and temperature. It is noted that regardless of the materials or sizes of the blocks, they will always reach the same final temperature.
  • #1
kirste
6
0
Just looking through some old papers and found a problem that I don't know how to solve.

Two identical 1.0-kilogram blocks of copper metal, one initially at a temp OC and the other initially at a temp of 100C are enclosed in a perfectly insulating container. The two blocks are initially separated. When the blocks are placed in contact, they come to equilibrium at a final temp of Tf. The amount of heat exchanged between the two blocks in this process is equal to which of the following? (the specific heat of copper metal is equal to 0.1 kilocalorie/kilogram K

I know that Spec. Heat=J/g.C, but other than that can someone give some general advice on how to solve this problem?

Thank you
 
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  • #2
Assume they come to equilibrium at a temperate half way between 0,100
So work out the energy needed to heat a block by 50K
 
  • #3
thats exactly what I needed to know :)
 
  • #4
It's an important difference between heat and temperature - actually pretty much the fundamental law of thermodynamics = Temperatures will always end up the same however much heat has to be transferred to make that happen.

If the blocks were different materials or size they would still end up at the same temperature although not necessarily 50deg - and the energy flowing between them would not be the same.
 

Related to Solving a Copper Metal Heat Exchange Problem: Seeking Advice

1. How do I determine the appropriate size for a copper heat exchange unit?

The appropriate size for a copper heat exchange unit can be determined by considering factors such as the desired heat transfer rate, surface area, and flow rate of the fluid being exchanged. Calculations can also be performed using equations such as the heat transfer coefficient equation and the Nusselt number equation.

2. What is the best method for cleaning a copper heat exchange unit?

The best method for cleaning a copper heat exchange unit is to use a solution of diluted acid, such as vinegar or citric acid, to remove any buildup or corrosion. The unit can then be flushed with water and dried thoroughly before use.

3. How can I prevent corrosion in a copper heat exchange unit?

To prevent corrosion in a copper heat exchange unit, it is important to choose the appropriate materials for the unit, such as using copper instead of steel. Additionally, regular cleaning and maintenance can help prevent buildup and corrosion. Using corrosion inhibitors in the fluid being exchanged can also be effective.

4. What is the most efficient way to transfer heat with a copper heat exchange unit?

The most efficient way to transfer heat with a copper heat exchange unit is to ensure that the surface area of the unit is maximized and that there is a high flow rate of the fluid being exchanged. Additionally, using materials with high thermal conductivity and keeping the temperature difference between the two fluids low can also improve efficiency.

5. How do I troubleshoot issues with a copper heat exchange unit?

To troubleshoot issues with a copper heat exchange unit, it is important to first identify the problem, such as reduced heat transfer or leaks. Then, the unit can be inspected for any physical damage or buildup that may be causing the issue. If necessary, the unit may need to be cleaned or repaired, or the design and operation may need to be adjusted for better performance.

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