Solving NLSE with Fourier Split Step in MATLAB

In summary: Overall, there are several methods you could try to improve the efficiency of your simulation and reduce the number of points needed. In summary, there are several ways to reduce the number of points needed in a simulation, such as using adaptive mesh refinement, polynomial extrapolation methods, or a spectral method. These methods can help improve the efficiency and accuracy of your simulation.
  • #1
n0_3sc
243
1
I'm not sure if this is the right section to post this thread but here goes...

I am solving the NLSE (nonlinear schroedinger equation) using the Fourier Split Step Method in MATLAB. To avoid MATLAB's boundary reflection problems and phase discontinuity's you naturally have to make the time/freq windows very very large. As a consequence you need to considerably increase the number of points and hence simulation time...Except increasing the number of points also makes your pulse less visible.

My question is whether or not their is a way to either:
- avoid the Fourier transform boundary reflections OR
- some how create a code that takes more points where your actual 'pulse of light' is and less points in the region where nothing exists.
 
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  • #2
It sounds like you're looking for a way to reduce the number of points needed in your simulation. One way could be to use a method such as adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), where you would only sample more points in areas where it is necessary, and fewer points in areas where it is not. Another option could be to use polynomial extrapolation methods, which would allow you to extrapolate from the points that have already been sampled, instead of having to calculate them all. Finally, you could also try using a spectral method, which uses a combination of Fourier transforms and numerical integration to solve the equation more efficiently.
 
  • #3


I commend you for using the Fourier Split Step Method to solve the NLSE in MATLAB. This is a powerful and widely used technique in numerical simulations of nonlinear systems. However, as you have mentioned, there are some challenges with this method, particularly in dealing with boundary reflections and phase discontinuities.

One way to address the issue of boundary reflections is to use a technique called "padding". This involves adding zeros to the end of your data before performing the Fourier transform. This effectively extends the length of your signal and can reduce the impact of boundary reflections. You can then remove the zeros after the transform is complete.

Another approach is to use a different numerical method that is less sensitive to boundary reflections, such as the split-step Fourier method or the pseudospectral method. These methods have been shown to be more accurate and efficient for solving the NLSE.

In terms of optimizing the number of points in your simulation, there are techniques such as adaptive mesh refinement that can dynamically adjust the number of points in different regions of your simulation domain. This can help to reduce the simulation time while still maintaining accuracy in regions where the pulse is present.

In conclusion, while the Fourier Split Step Method is a powerful tool for solving the NLSE, it is important to consider the limitations and potential challenges associated with it. By using techniques such as padding and adaptive mesh refinement, you can improve the accuracy and efficiency of your simulations.
 

Related to Solving NLSE with Fourier Split Step in MATLAB

What is the NLSE and why is it important to solve it?

The Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation (NLSE) is a fundamental equation in quantum mechanics that describes the behavior of wave-like systems, such as light or matter waves. It is important because it allows us to understand and predict the behavior of these systems, which has numerous applications in fields such as optics, fiber optics, and condensed matter physics.

What is the Fourier Split Step method and why is it used to solve the NLSE?

The Fourier Split Step method is a numerical method used to solve the NLSE. It involves breaking down the equation into simpler parts and then using the Fourier transform to solve each part separately. This method is particularly useful for solving the NLSE because it can handle nonlinear terms and is computationally efficient.

Why is MATLAB commonly used to solve the NLSE with the Fourier Split Step method?

MATLAB is a powerful programming language and software environment commonly used in scientific research. It has built-in functions and tools for performing Fourier transforms and solving differential equations, making it a convenient choice for solving the NLSE with the Fourier Split Step method. Additionally, MATLAB allows for easy visualization of results and can handle large datasets efficiently.

What are some challenges of solving the NLSE with the Fourier Split Step method in MATLAB?

One challenge is choosing appropriate parameters for the simulation, such as the time and spatial discretization steps. These parameters can greatly affect the accuracy and efficiency of the solution. Another challenge is dealing with the numerical errors that can arise in the simulation, such as aliasing and round-off errors. These errors can be minimized by carefully choosing the simulation parameters and using appropriate methods for handling them.

What are some applications of using the NLSE and the Fourier Split Step method in MATLAB?

The NLSE and the Fourier Split Step method in MATLAB have numerous applications in fields such as optics, fiber optics, and condensed matter physics. They can be used to study the behavior of light in optical fibers, to model the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates, and to simulate the propagation of solitons in nonlinear media, among others. These applications have practical implications in fields such as telecommunication, optical signal processing, and quantum computing.

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