Speed of Light in All Reference Frames: A Question

In summary: That's a basic postulate of special relativity: the speed of light is the same in all frames of reference.In summary, the concept of relativity prohibits an object from moving at the speed of light in any frame of reference. However, if an object is moving at a high velocity, such as 0.99c, with respect to another object, both objects will measure the speed of light to be 3X10^8 m/s. This is one of the fundamental principles of special relativity.
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It's said that, speed of light is same in every frame is reference. Consider an ideal situation, if I'm also moving at the speed of light, will I feel light to be at rest or still at the speed of light itself according to my frame of reference?
 
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Dr. Manoj said:
if I'm also moving at the speed of light
You cannot without violating relativity. Asking what relativity predicts if relativity cannot be applied is pointless.
 
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mfb said:
You cannot without violating relativity. Asking what relativity predicts if relativity cannot be applied is pointless.

Sorry, I did not get you.
 
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The question you asked just does not make sense.

"If I do not exist, where do I live?"
 
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Dr. Manoj said:
Consider an ideal situation, if I'm also moving at the speed of light, will I feel light to be at rest or still at the speed of light itself according to my frame of reference?
The problem is that relativity prohibits you from moving at the speed of light with respect to anything. That's why your question is meaningless as stated.

But we can change your question a bit so that it's answerable: What if you were moving at 0.99c with respect to me? If either you or I shine a beam of light, we would both measure that light to be moving at the usual speed c with respect to ourselves.

Does that help?
 
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  • #6
Doc Al said:
But we can change your question a bit so that it's answerable: What if you were moving at 0.99c with respect to me? If either you or I shine a beam of light, we would both measure that light to be moving at the usual speed c with respect to ourselves.
What he said.

You might also try googling for "relativistic velocity addition", and search this forum for threads that mention that phrase.
If, having done that, you find yourself thinking "That is absurd. Why would anyone believe that? What proof is there?" check out the sticky thread at the top of this forum on experimental proof of relativity.
 
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  • #7
Doc Al said:
The problem is that relativity prohibits you from moving at the speed of light with respect to anything. That's why your question is meaningless as stated.

But we can change your question a bit so that it's answerable: What if you were moving at 0.99c with respect to me? If either you or I shine a beam of light, we would both measure that light to be moving at the usual speed c with respect to ourselves.

Does that help?

Thank you for clearing my doubt. I got you. Means even if we are moving with whatever possible speed less than speed of light, with respect to the frame, we still see the speed of light to be 3X10^8 m/s only right?
 
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Dr. Manoj said:
It's said that, speed of light is same in every frame is reference. Consider an ideal situation, if I'm also move at half of the speed of light, will I feel light to be still moving at the speed of light itself that is 3X10^8m/s according to my frame of reference?
 
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mfb said:
The question you asked just does not make sense.

"If I do not exist, where do I live?"

Sorry I've reposted the corrected question again in comments please check it out. Thanks for correcting me
 
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Dr. Manoj said:
Means even if we are moving with whatever possible speed less than speed of light, with respect to the frame, we still see the speed of light to be 3X10^8 m/s only right?

Right.
 

1. What is the speed of light in all reference frames?

The speed of light in all reference frames is approximately 299,792,458 meters per second (or about 186,282 miles per second).

2. How does the speed of light relate to time and space?

According to Einstein's theory of relativity, the speed of light is constant in all reference frames and is a fundamental constant in the universe. This means that the speed of light is the same for all observers, regardless of their relative motion, and is not affected by time and space.

3. Can anything travel faster than the speed of light?

No, according to the laws of physics, nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. As an object approaches the speed of light, it experiences time dilation and length contraction, making it impossible to surpass the speed of light.

4. How is the speed of light measured in different reference frames?

The speed of light can be measured using various methods, such as using lasers and mirrors, or by observing the Doppler shift of light from moving sources. The measurements will always yield the same value of approximately 299,792,458 meters per second.

5. What are the implications of the constant speed of light in all reference frames?

The constant speed of light is a fundamental principle in physics and has many implications. It forms the basis of Einstein's theory of relativity, which has revolutionized our understanding of time, space, and gravity. It also has practical applications, such as in GPS systems and particle accelerators.

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