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Standing Waves on a String (Melde's Experiment)

  1. Jan 16, 2007 #1
    The problem is as follows:

    "A string exhibits standing waves with 4 antinodes when a mass of 200 g is hanging over the pulley (see attached figure). What mass will produce a standing wave pattern with 6 antinodes?"

    The equations that I have found in the relevant section of the text are as follows:

    [tex]v=\sqrt{\frac{T}{\mu}}[/tex]

    [tex]v=f\lambda[/tex]

    [tex]f=\frac{1}{\lambda}\sqrt{\frac{T}{\mu}}[/tex]

    [tex]T=mg[/tex]

    [tex]\frac{1}{n}=\frac{1}{Lf}\sqrt{\frac{T}{\mu}}=[\frac{1}{Lf}\sqrt{\frac{g}{\mu}}}]\sqrt{m}[/tex]

    Where...
    T = tension in the spring as supplied by the weight of the hanging mass
    mu = linear density of the string
    lambda = wavelength
    f = frequency of oscillation
    m = mass suspended from spring
    g = gravitational constant
    L = length of the string

    I've attached the diagram referenced above for further illustration.

    [​IMG]

    I have no idea where to even begin with the problem given the lack of information provided by the question.

    Please help!
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 17, 2007 #2

    OlderDan

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    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    All the information you need is given. You need to find the relative change in the wavelength to determine the relative change in velocity, and from that determine the relative change in tension, and ultimately the relative change in the mass.
     
  4. Apr 8, 2010 #3
    therez no diagram attached to it ..... can u plz attach it again or give us a link for the diagram !!
     
  5. Apr 8, 2010 #4

    and can u explain how u got the last eqn after T=mg
     
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