Strength of Magnetic Field Without Gaussmeter

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

Hi, I'm a senior in high school trying to learn more about magnetism and magnetic shielding outside of my classes (I'm pursuing a degree in Materials Sciences at Penn State beginning this fall). I have been trying to determine a way to make a quantitative measure of a magnetic field's strength without a gaussmeter. One method I am considering can be found here:
http://www.frontiernet.net/~jlkeefer/magstren.htm

Can anyone verify if this method will be effective if I am using an axially magnetized neodymium magnet as opposed to a bar magnet as specified in these directions? I would also like to measure the field's strength with a shielding alloy. My concern is that this method will not be accurate enough to provide me with good results or the compass will be too sensitive to a magnet of this strength, though the magnet is just the size of a dime.

Also, if anyone knows of any other methods to determine magnetic field strength without a gaussmeter I would like to know.
Thank you.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
247
1
Using the law of inverse squares to determine the field strength seems very reasonable to me. Since the magnitude of the Earth's magnetic poles are known, using the Earth's magnetic field as a reference, again, seems very reasonable to me. Using the deflection of a compass needle offers a great way to accurately measure the relative field strength. So, yes, I think this method sounds well thought out and viable.

As long as you center the magnet's pole on your measuring device, I see no reason the method won't work. You may have to use a measuring device in excess of 1 meter, but that is a fairly trivial modification.

Fish
 
  • #3
247
1
Using the law of inverse squares to determine the field strength seems very reasonable to me. Since the magnitude of the Earth's magnetic poles are known, using the Earth's magnetic field as a reference, again, seems very reasonable to me. Using the deflection of a compass needle offers a great way to accurately measure the relative field strength. So, yes, I think this method sounds well thought out and viable.

As long as you center the magnet's pole on your measuring device, I see no reason the method won't work. You may have to use a measuring device in excess of 1 meter, but that is a fairly trivial modification.

Fish
 

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