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Programs Studying Physics Courses at 50 years old

  • Thread starter jlcd
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What leads you to expect that?
40 yrs is a long time. There is now gold mine in beyond standard model.. bec no one has seen anything new. Hossenfelder called it Lost in Math. So like treasure hunt where everyone is lost. Everyone has a chance. But if within the treasure hunt, someone else figure it out 20 yrs from now. No problem. Its part of it. Meantime i wanna join the teasure hunt. How will i sign up. Part online course part hands on actual will be fine.
 

symbolipoint

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Wait. I think half of those who become physicists had planned to solve a major mystery. Don't they? It's part of it.

In the book Nobel Dreams and How I Lost the Nobel. You can see there is fierce competition among practicing scientists who got the Nobel. So it is part of the nature.

I expect by 90 years old. I should at least solved one of them. If not. I won't waste 40 years to become a physicist. I'd become spend my remaining years in the Yacht or trip around the world. But those thoeretical problems always haunt me daily.
Unrealistic and impractical!!

If finance and sources of funding will be no problem (and no scheduling troubles), then go ahead and review the necessary Mathematics, continue onward with the necessary Calc 1-2-3-&Differential Equations and the necessary physics courses for undergraduate degree, along with other courses needed for undergrad degree, through admission to undergraduate program and actually attending the courses for-real. Once BS/BA is earned, and if you are assessable officially as really good enough, then some graduate degree might be the next goal.

Now, during any of that, will health problems emerge and stop you in your educational process?
 
274
7
Unrealistic and impractical!!

If finance and sources of funding will be no problem (and no scheduling troubles), then go ahead and review the necessary Mathematics, continue onward with the necessary Calc 1-2-3-&Differential Equations and the necessary physics courses for undergraduate degree, along with other courses needed for undergrad degree, through admission to undergraduate program and actually attending the courses for-real. Once BS/BA is earned, and if you are assessable officially as really good enough, then some graduate degree might be the next goal.

Now, during any of that, will health problems emerge and stop you in your educational process?
That's why I'm struggling with the following dilemma.

1. What if I hide all my findings and even data and awaiting that day when i can solve the equations much like Einstein was figuring out the math of General Relativity. In his case, if he hadn't discovered it. Someone else like Hilbert could do it within 10 years.

2. My dilemma is worse. What if I hide all the data and got sick and gone. And on one else discovered it in the next hundred years or more? Is it equal to almost crimes againt humanity? (I struggle with this inner debate at times).

The point is. If I share all the findings and data, what if someone can develope the theory ahead of me and got the Nobel Prize (instead of me)?

(First some background, In the field, competition is fierce and many vocalized it such as the book "How I Lost the Nobel Prize". Many got bitter. So let's face the truth that it matters. And I'm saying this because most of us are anonymous so all topics can be discussed and no use keeping it to ourselves.)

What would you choose if given the choice?

1. Hiding all finding and data and they becoming lost when you are gone (say in sudden illnesses or accident) and another century or two gone by before someone could discover them (This is assuming your theory and discovery can help humanity and billions immensely for generations to come).

2. Or just risk it all by sharing every stuff with everybody and someone beat you to it and the discovery changed the world (but no one would remember you 400 years from now)?

Would you choose the former or can accept the latter (and bear sacrifices)?
 
You seem to be suggesting that by studying you will automatically be able to solve these problems. It seems delusional to think that you will solve them if only you had the time and knowledge that many others already have. I mean, good luck to you, but what is it that makes you so certain in your belief that it will be you that has the ability to solve any of the 5 issues you highlighted?

Likewise before you have even started studying...it's a bit early to be thinking about hiding research...
 
274
7
You seem to be suggesting that by studying you will automatically be able to solve these problems. It seems delusional to think that you will solve them if only you had the time and knowledge that many others already have. I mean, good luck to you, but what is it that makes you so certain in your belief that it will be you that has the ability to solve any of the 5 issues you highlighted?

Likewise before you have even started studying...it's a bit early to be thinking about hiding research...
I wish I were delusional.

Well, I had been thinking how to reply it so I'd not get warning by the mods. I think the following is the best I can come up.

What do you think of Sabine Hossenfelder?

She made me realize now is the best time to be a physicist. Lack of any new experimental data has reset and level the playing fields. So all are back to square one. And if one studies enough. One can become equal to the legendary Hossenfelder. Remember she wrote:


The LHC "Nightmare Scenerio" has Come True
"...we’ve entered what has become known as the “nightmare scenario” for the LHC: The Higgs and nothing else. Many particle physicists thought of this as the worst possible outcome. It has left them without guidance, lost in a thicket of rapidly multiplying models. Without some new physics, they have nothing to work with that they haven’t already had for 50 years, no new input that can tell them in which direction to look for the ultimate goal of unification and/or quantum gravity.

That the LHC hasn’t seen evidence for new physics is to me a clear signal that we’ve been doing something wrong, that our experience from constructing the standard model is no longer a promising direction to continue. We’ve maneuvered ourselves into a dead end by relying on aesthetic guidance to decide which experiments are the most promising. I hope that this latest null result will send a clear message that you can’t trust the judgement of scientists whose future funding depends on their continued optimism."

Now can someone give me the links to the best online courses.. at least to study some math for start and basic physics degree. Then would look for a physical school for my doctorate.
 

Vanadium 50

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Meantime i wanna join the teasure hunt
You're the first 50-year old I have ever seen use the non-word "wanna".
 

ZapperZ

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I wish I were delusional.

Well, I had been thinking how to reply it so I'd not get warning by the mods. I think the following is the best I can come up.

What do you think of Sabine Hossenfelder?

She made me realize now is the best time to be a physicist. Lack of any new experimental data has reset and level the playing fields. So all are back to square one. And if one studies enough. One can become equal to the legendary Hossenfelder. Remember she wrote:


The LHC "Nightmare Scenerio" has Come True
"...we’ve entered what has become known as the “nightmare scenario” for the LHC: The Higgs and nothing else. Many particle physicists thought of this as the worst possible outcome. It has left them without guidance, lost in a thicket of rapidly multiplying models. Without some new physics, they have nothing to work with that they haven’t already had for 50 years, no new input that can tell them in which direction to look for the ultimate goal of unification and/or quantum gravity.

That the LHC hasn’t seen evidence for new physics is to me a clear signal that we’ve been doing something wrong, that our experience from constructing the standard model is no longer a promising direction to continue. We’ve maneuvered ourselves into a dead end by relying on aesthetic guidance to decide which experiments are the most promising. I hope that this latest null result will send a clear message that you can’t trust the judgement of scientists whose future funding depends on their continued optimism."

Now can someone give me the links to the best online courses.. at least to study some math for start and basic physics degree. Then would look for a physical school for my doctorate.
You are not only delusional, but you also have a very short memory on the history of physics.

It was only a few years ago that people were questioning if our elementary particle physics was right when the Tevatron struggled to find the Higgs. There were already theorists coming up with alternative scenario of our universe without the Higgs, and how the Standard Model had to be reformulated, etc... A whole bunch of people were running around as if the sky is falling down.

And now, with the LHC not finding anything beyond the SM, we are seeing the SAME thing. I can dial back several decades before 1985, when the world thought that there was nothing more to be discovered on superconductivity, that it was a matured field and has reached a dead end. Again, it took only 2 years for the entire idea to turn upside down.

It seems that people like you never learned, and that is ironic considering that you are wishing to learn physics, but failed to learned about the history of physics. You are forgetting that in the scale of time, the discovery of the Higgs has been only VERY recent, and that things are getting to be more and more difficult to discover and to single out. But somehow, just like in 1985, and just like right before the LHC when into full operations, the vultures seems to already be flying around impatiently proclaiming that something is either dead, or going nowhere.

And this is based on what? On one pop science book that you have been obsessing over?

Well, I too can make a prediction. I predict that you will NOT be going into physics, and even if you try, you will fail to make it through. I base this on years of observations of students that went into this field, and all the years of interactions with people in this forum. You have no clue on what is involved and how much work is required. Your fallacy of thinking that you can simply dial up a discovery is pure delusion.

Nothing here has changed my opinion that this is all science fantasy.

Zz.
 

ZapperZ

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Now can someone give me the links to the best online courses.. at least to study some math for start and basic physics degree. Then would look for a physical school for my doctorate.
And oh, since you are so keen in following the footsteps of some of the giants in physics, why don't you follow what they also did? How many of them, do you think, got their physics degrees from ".. online courses..."? Do you think Sabine Hossenfelder got hers that way?

Zz.
 

fresh_42

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I think we may assume that the question has been discussed in all details. I doesn't make sense to repeat in variations what already has been said.

Thread closed.
 
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I have temporarily unlocked the thread just to mention how you could do what the OP wants. Check out:

Some of the schools you transfer to are good - one being named UK university of the year. You get a Masters then a Phd.

This is just information for those interested in actually studying physics now they are retired or finacially independent. You do not do it because you want a Nobel - you do it for the reasons Feynman famously said. Physics is not important - love is. He simply loved physics. So if you are finding you love physics and are older then do not let age stop you from getting a PhD and doing research work - it can be done. But do it for the right reason - Feynman's reason. And if you love physics words of discouragement will not change that love - you will be compelled by something deep inside to do it.

Thanks
Bill
 

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