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Suppose that you are standing on a train accelerating at 0.1g

  1. Feb 18, 2015 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Suppose that you are standing on a train accelerating at 0.16g. What minimum coefficient of static friction must exist between your feet and the floor if you are not to slide?


    2. Relevant equations
    F=ma

    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 18, 2015 #2

    DaveC426913

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  4. Feb 18, 2015 #3

    DaveC426913

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    Gina: You must show your attempts at a solution before we can help you.

    MindGeek: Please start your own thread and: You must show your attempts at a solution before we can help you.
     
  5. Feb 18, 2015 #4
    I'm not sure where to start
     
  6. Feb 18, 2015 #5
    Dave,

    I gave Gina an official warning about no attempt, and gave MindGeek a warning about hijacking a thread. He was directed to start a new thread. Thanks for also alerting these new members.

    Chet
     
  7. Feb 18, 2015 #6
    At the top of each Forum, there is a big blue button entitled Start New Thread. Yours sounds like homework, so you should post in one of the homework forums using the required template.

    Chet
     
  8. Feb 18, 2015 #7
    Thanks will do
     
  9. Feb 19, 2015 #8
    am I allowed to propose a start to a solution?, no worries either way but I'd thought id see if trying to help would help
     
  10. Feb 19, 2015 #9
    As long as it's only a hint or a leading question.

    Chet
     
  11. Feb 19, 2015 #10
    the maximum force static friction can exert is quantified based on the cooeficient of static friction and another force, if you know what this is you didn't specify or thered be another "Relevant Equation"

    This maximum frictional force is whats keeping you moving with the train, you know F=ma, so you know what that maximum force must be right, I feel I should have you show me some more before I give you any more than that
     
  12. Feb 19, 2015 #11
    EDIT: you dont know your mass so you don't tecnically know the max force needed but your m's will cancel
     
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