Switching from a biomedical physics major to physics

  • #1
Ergulde
12
1
I'm currently doing a biomedical physics major because it's the best choice to follow the med school track in something physics related, and is a really good fallback plan as my advisor described it. Now my true passion is in physics and I really want to get a PhD later on, so if I didn't make it into med school, does anyone have any idea of how long it could take me to then get a physics BS after finishing my biomedical physics major?

If you think taking a physics major in the first place to get into med school, please feel free to tell me why.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Choppy
Science Advisor
Education Advisor
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A lot really depends on the specifics of your particular "biomedical physics" program. Some are essentially a physics program with some upper year electives related to medical physics and biophysics. Others have a more watered down physics curriculum and may not be accepted as a prerequisite degree for a physics graduate program. So it really depends. Look up the physics major's required courses at your school. How much extra time would it take to cover those on your current path? In most cases the difference probably comes down to a couple of courses.

As for taking a straight physics major for getting into medicine - the only real concern is covering the prerequisite courses. Provided you get in the organic chemistry, biology, etc. that are required for entry, it doesn't matter what you do your degree in. I think the main consequence of this is that you fill up your electives quickly with medical school prerequisites and there is less flexibility to take other courses. For some people this isn't a problem.
 
  • #3
Ergulde
12
1
A lot really depends on the specifics of your particular "biomedical physics" program. Some are essentially a physics program with some upper year electives related to medical physics and biophysics. Others have a more watered down physics curriculum and may not be accepted as a prerequisite degree for a physics graduate program. So it really depends. Look up the physics major's required courses at your school. How much extra time would it take to cover those on your current path? In most cases the difference probably comes down to a couple of courses.

As for taking a straight physics major for getting into medicine - the only real concern is covering the prerequisite courses. Provided you get in the organic chemistry, biology, etc. that are required for entry, it doesn't matter what you do your degree in. I think the main consequence of this is that you fill up your electives quickly with medical school prerequisites and there is less flexibility to take other courses. For some people this isn't a problem.

For me that isn't a problem, I'd prefer taking science courses such as biology or organic chemistry. But my only issue is the time factor now, I was barely able to take 6 credits in my first semester because my transcripts took too long to be processed from Lebanon. But also because I took high school in Lebanon, which will hopefully be in my favor when it comes to taking the hard classes under too much pressure.
 

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