Temperature change in a vacuum?

In summary, the group came up with the idea of transporting vaccines in a vacuum chamber to maintain a certain temperature. They have not done much research on the topic yet, and would like to try it out.
  • #1
Jake Parker
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Hello, I'm currently taking some summer classes at my college and was assigned a project to transport vaccines from one location to another (travel time ~2-5 hours.) We have to keep the vaccine within the range of 35-46 degrees Fahrenheit at all times. My group and I came up with the idea of putting 36 degree vaccines in a vacuum chamber and assuming that temperature change for the duration of the trip would not change, therefore eliminating the need for some sort of refrigeration unit. If the outside temperature is between 20-50 degrees, will the vaccine be able to maintain a temperature within the range, or are we missing a big piece of science behind a vacuum chamber? Thanks and have a great day!
 
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  • #2
"Vacuum chamber," or thermos bottle?
 
  • #3
Try it. Take the container the vaccine ships in, fill it with water at a temperature of 36 degrees, put it in your vacuum chamber, leave the chamber in a 50 degree environment for five hours, then check the temperature of your water. Repeat in a 20 degree environment (may be harder to find) to make sure that you won't go below the minimum temperature either.

You can try calculating the rate of heat transfer to see if your idea has a chance of working, but:
1) you'll need to know something about how effectively the particular vacuum chamber you have in mind holds heat, and unless that information is available from the manufacturer you'll have to do some measurements anyways.
2) no matter how much theory-based calculating you do, you're not going to trust the results until you've tried it.
 
  • #4
Bystander said:
"Vacuum chamber," or thermos bottle?
I mean we came up with vacuum chamber but we haven't done a lot of research on it. Will one do better than the other?
 
  • #5
Well, a thermos bottle incorporates a vacuum chamber, is inexpensive, and is designed for easy transportation and effective insulation. Sounds like a good start if you can find one that your vaccine container will fit into...

But you will not know for sure until you try it. There's a reason why scientists do experiments as well as calculations.
 
  • #6
Just to cover the obvious that no one has said yet: a vacuum does not eliminate heat transfer. You still have conduction and radiation.
 
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  • #7
Another thing you could try if you're looking for something quick, simple, and cheap (but you'll want to experiment on it in any case, as Nugatory has already pointed out) is to use a high grade themos but put it inside one of those plastic picnic coolers with a some ice cubes (depending on how hot it is outside). I'll bet that will last for 5 hours.
 
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  • #8
Jake Parker said:
transport vaccine
"Vaccine" implies liquid phase, implies vapor pressure, implies vapor tight seal r/t rubber septa, implies storage in "vacuum" is going to be difficult? Picnic plus thermos, yes.
 
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1. What is temperature change in a vacuum?

Temperature change in a vacuum refers to the change in temperature of an object or substance when it is placed in a vacuum, which is a space devoid of air or any other matter.

2. Why does temperature change in a vacuum?

In a vacuum, there is no air or matter to transfer heat, so the object or substance is unable to exchange heat with its surroundings. This leads to a change in temperature as the object attempts to reach thermal equilibrium.

3. How does temperature change in a vacuum affect the object?

The absence of air in a vacuum can cause the object to experience extreme temperature changes, as there is no air to regulate the temperature and dissipate heat. This can lead to the object either becoming very hot or very cold.

4. Can temperature change in a vacuum be controlled?

Yes, temperature change in a vacuum can be controlled by introducing a controlled source of heat or cooling, such as a heating or cooling element, to the object or substance.

5. What are the applications of temperature change in a vacuum?

Temperature change in a vacuum has various applications in scientific research and industries. It is used in processes such as freeze-drying, vacuum ovens, and vacuum distillation. It is also used in space exploration and in the development of certain materials and products.

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