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Solid State Textbook for understanding thermodynamics

  1. Aug 19, 2015 #1
    I'm taking a second course in thermodynamics and statmech, but it has always been a subject I have found unintuitive. Could anyone recommend a clear, concise textbook with a strong emphasis on mathematics/ mathematical physics? Thank you for any suggestions.
     
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  3. Aug 19, 2015 #2

    Bystander

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    For physics? Mechanical engineering? Chemistry?
     
  4. Aug 19, 2015 #3
    for physics, leaning more towards the theoretical/mathematical side than applications, if possible.
     
  5. Aug 19, 2015 #4

    Bystander

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    Kittel?
     
  6. Aug 19, 2015 #5
  7. Aug 19, 2015 #6
    Also the book by Ira Levine is quite good. Don't try Atkins in my opinion. Atkins does "half-derivations" which left me with a "half-understanding" of concepts.
     
  8. Aug 19, 2015 #7
  9. Aug 20, 2015 #8

    vanhees71

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    As an introduction my favorite is

    H. B. Callen, Thermodynamics and an Introduction to Statistical Physics

    A standard advanced textbook is

    F. Reif, Fundamentals of Statistical and Thermal Physics

    A very good one is also

    C. M Van Vliet, Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics

    Also vol. V of Landau and Lifshitz is highly recommendable. Also Vols. IX and X on quantum equilibrium and kinetic theory (transport equations), respectively, are excellent.
     
  10. Aug 22, 2015 #9

    atyy

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