The Answer: Why Is Hydrogen Positive?

In summary, the conversation is discussing the statement made by a physics teacher about hydrogen being positive. The person is confused because hydrogen is electrically neutral due to its one proton and one electron. It is mentioned that this statement may be referring to the role of hydrogen atoms in molecules, where they can pick up a partial positive charge due to bond polarization. This is seen in polar molecules like water, where the hydrogen atoms are slightly positive and the oxygen atom is slightly negative, leading to the stickiness of water.
  • #1
FeDeX_LaTeX
Gold Member
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"Hydrogen Is Positive"

Hello;

My physics teacher said that hydrogen was positive. But, I don't understand why this is true. I thought hydrogen, like any other element, was electrically neutral (because it has 1 proton and 1 electron). So why is it positive?

Thanks.
 
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  • #2


FeDeX_LaTeX said:
Hello;

My physics teacher said that hydrogen was positive. But, I don't understand why this is true. I thought hydrogen, like any other element, was electrically neutral (because it has 1 proton and 1 electron). So why is it positive?

Thanks.

Yeah .. hard to tell if that was just sloppy, or if there was a point he/she was trying to make. I cannot see what it would be though, if it was just about a free H-atom. If it's about the role H-atoms play in molecules, then it would make a little more sense, since H-atoms usually pick up a partial positive charge in molecules due to bond polarization. But still, it seems like an awfully sweeping generalization.
 
  • #3


Is it possible that your teacher was talking about a molecule of water? H2O is a polar molecule and the positive side will be towards the hydrogen atoms.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polar_molecule
 
  • #4


That's what makes water sticky isn't it? Because the hydrogen is positive in the water molecule which sticks to the oxygen atom in the water molecule because it is slightly negative.

Can you explain to me a bit more what bond polarization is?
 
  • #5


I can explain why hydrogen is considered a positive element. While it is true that hydrogen has one proton and one electron, the electron in hydrogen is not always present. In fact, it is often lost in chemical reactions, leaving behind a positively charged hydrogen ion (H+). This is because hydrogen has a relatively low ionization energy, meaning that it takes very little energy to remove its electron. This results in hydrogen having a net positive charge, making it a positive element. Additionally, the proton in hydrogen has a positive charge, contributing to its overall positive nature. I hope this helps clarify why hydrogen is considered positive.
 

1. What is the atomic structure of hydrogen?

Hydrogen has one proton and one electron, giving it an atomic number of 1. It is the lightest and simplest element, with a single electron orbiting a single proton in its nucleus.

2. Why is hydrogen considered a positive element?

Hydrogen is considered a positive element because it only has one electron in its outer shell, making it highly reactive and likely to lose that electron in chemical reactions. This results in a positively charged ion.

3. How does hydrogen become positively charged?

Hydrogen becomes positively charged when it loses its lone electron in a chemical reaction. This can happen, for example, when it reacts with a more electronegative element like oxygen or chlorine.

4. What are the properties of hydrogen as a positive ion?

As a positive ion, hydrogen is highly reactive and has a tendency to bond with other elements to form compounds. It also has a high charge-to-mass ratio, making it a key component in many chemical reactions and energy production processes.

5. What is the role of hydrogen as a positive element in the universe?

Hydrogen plays a crucial role in the universe as a positive element. It is the most abundant element in the universe and makes up a large part of stars, including our sun. It is also a key component in the formation of other elements, such as helium, through processes like nuclear fusion.

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