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Positive Hydrogen Ion = Proton?

  1. Apr 7, 2010 #1

    FeDeX_LaTeX

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    Gold Member

    Hello;

    Is this statement true? A hydrogen positive ion would have no electrons, and pure hydrogen itself has no neutrons. Therefore, would it simply be a proton?

    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 7, 2010 #2

    mathman

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    Science Advisor

    Yes. Small complication - in water the proton is often attached to a water molecule, rather than by itself.
     
  4. Apr 7, 2010 #3
    Yes. When talking about Bronsted acids and bases one talks about proton donors and proton acceptors..
     
  5. Apr 7, 2010 #4

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Note that this "attachement" is reatively weak. Protons are "jumping" between water molecules all the time. When compared with other compounds water molecules are "short living" - for example is you mix equimolar amounts of heavy water with normal water after few minutes you will have mixture containing H2O, HDO and D2O in 1:2:1 ratio.

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  6. Apr 7, 2010 #5
    Yes, as long as the atom isn't deuterium or tritium.
     
  7. Apr 8, 2010 #6

    mathman

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    What I meant by attach is to form H3O+
     
  8. Apr 8, 2010 #7

    Borek

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    I know, and you are right - but it doesn't change the general picture. All protons in H3O+ are equivalent, so they all can move between water molecules. That is assuming H3O+ exists, as larger conglomerates has been suggested (and observed) as well.

    Water is very dynamic, in a way much more than other liquids, as it is not just a matter of separate molecules bouncing each other, but also exchange of protons.

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