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The cylindrical chamber electric field

  1. Jun 15, 2010 #1
    In the cylindrical chamber, the voltage is applied to a very thin wire, a few mills of an inch in diameter, stretched axially at the center of the cylinder. The cylinder wall is usually grounded. The electric field is, in this case,

    E=[tex]\frac{V_{0}}{Ln(b/a)r}[/tex]
    where
    a = radius of the central wire
    b = radius of the counter
    r = distance from the center of the counter
    sea figure
    http://img412.imageshack.us/img412/3176/84851789.jpg [Broken]
    how i can prove this equation
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 15, 2010 #2
    The electric field as a function of charge is easily derived with Gauss' law. Then charge and voltage can be related through capacitance. Capacitance of a cylyndrical capacitor is well known and the derivation can quickly found in any EM book or with Google.
     
  4. Jun 17, 2010 #3
    thanks
     
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