The most effective advertising subterfuge

  • Thread starter Loren Booda
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In summary: I like to see how they get creative with their advertising.In summary, I avoid advertisements, and there is no advertisement that influences me to buy anything. I don't watch ads on TV - I usually watch Public Broadcasting, and I generally (almost exclusively) listen to Public Radio. If I listen to commercial radio, I change channels or turn down the volume during commercials which I find rather obnoxious. I ignore advertisements in print media. I buy what's on sale. I use Consumer Reports, Washington Consumer Checkbook, and an analytical, efficient mindset when shopping. I like to see how theonion acquires more and more creative with their advertising.
  • #1
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Web, TV, radio, print media, etc. - whose ads have captivated you, and which of those actually influence you to buy?
 
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  • #2
I avoid advertisements, and there is no advertisement that influences me to buy anything. I dont' watch ads on TV - I usually watch Public Broadcasting, and I generally (almost exclusively) listen to Public Radio. If I listen to commercial radio, I change channels or turn down the volume during commercials which I find rather obnoxious. I ignore advertisements in print media.

If I buy something expensive, like a car or computer, I do independent research.

My wife does most of the shopping since I have a strong aversion to shopping. If I buy something like shoes or clothes, I tend to buy inexpensive stuff that no one would advertise. :biggrin:

I generally avoid malls and heavy concentrations of shoppers. :yuck:
 
  • #3
I can't say that any commercial has ever influenced me to buy a particular product, however many commercials have convinced to avoid certain products - payback for sleazy or annoying advertising techniques.
 
  • #4
I do really enjoy certain commercials for a few viewings. For example, I like Geiko's caveman plot.

Have you seen the latest? The caveman is getting couseling. :rofl:
 
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  • #5
I cannot "shop" due to a disability that leaves me crippled with respiratory problems, migraines, and hypertension when I breathe fragrance chemicals. Even before this problem arose (about 15 years ago) I never went to a store unless I needed something, and then I bought what I needed and left. I have never knowingly bought anything on the basis of an advertisement. Every advertisement is a lie, accentuating the perception that you NEED the product, and that no other product can possible do. Catch a clue, people!
 
  • #6
I think the last commercial that tempted me to buy anything was the old Bartles and Jaymes commercials. "Thank you for your support"
 
  • #7
Ivan Seeking said:
I can't say that any commercial has ever influenced me to buy a particular product
You do realize (as I hope everyone here does), that the influencing is entirely unconscious?

Companies cannot hope to sway shoppers who have carefully weighed their needs and compared products and chosen the best one based on facts. Nope.

Companies rely on the well-known fact that most purchases are made without this kind of research. Because of our busy lives, we don't have time - and frankly don't care - which brand of toilet paper we buy, we usually reach for one based on what we "know" we want.

And that is not a rational decision, it is driven largely by our background decision-making processes, which ARE subject to such influences as the correlation between a brand image and its desirability. A product that has an emotionally positive association will be likely reached for.

But simply, yet most importantly - a product that HAS an image in the shopper's mind is far more likely to be chosen. i.e. the stronger the image, the more it is chosen. Simply being in your face is a very strong motivator. nine six seven eleven eleven... the single best known jingle in marketing history.

If you think you make rational decisions about every purchase, you're fooling yourself. And that's perfectly OK with product companies, who hope you never figure this out.
 
  • #8
I buy what's on sale.
 
  • #9
DaveC426913 said:
Companies rely on the well-known fact that most purchases are made without this kind of research. Because of our busy lives, we don't have time - and frankly don't care - which brand of toilet paper we buy, we usually reach for one based on what we "know" we want.

:uhh: They've obviously not counted on people like me who will figure out the per sheet price on toilet paper before deciding which one to buy.

And, last time I went to buy dishwasher detergent, they had a sale on the large size...I figured out the per ounce price and realized it was STILL cheaper to buy the smaller size, even with the larger one on sale! :rolleyes: The brand was determined by trial and error (I started out with the cheapest and just moved up the prices until I got to one that rinsed off completely and actually cleaned the dishes well...I didn't expect the cheapest ones to be all that different from the more expensive ones, but apparently the cheapest of the cheap aren't that good).

Though, you're right that if someone WERE influenced by advertising subterfuge, they'd hardly be aware of it, or else it wasn't subterfuge.
 
  • #10
When does the "soft sell" (e. g., Bartles and Jaymes) work better than the "in your face" commercials?

For the best quality with the lowest price, I use Consumer Reports, Washington Consumer Checkbook and an analytical, efficient mindset.
 
  • #11
One thing I have been watching over the past year or so is how theonion acquires more and more commercials disguised as semi-humorous articles. They don't say the articles are commercials, but some of them clearly are, unless they have somebody really avant-garde behind the scenes.
 
  • #12
Moonbear said:
:uhh: They've obviously not counted on people like me who will figure out the per sheet price on toilet paper before deciding which one to buy.
They do. They fall under the 'does research' category.

P.S. One place I absolutely refuse to price-shop is on toilet paper, despite the wife's objections. I simply tell her that she doesn't know what it's like to have my delicate artist's heiny.
 
  • #13
I am genrally not pursuaded by advertising, but, I got to admit, I do secretly desire that "cold heat" soldering iron that's on constantly on TV. :redface:
 
  • #14
The "cold heat" soldering iron is a complete rip-off -- read up on it.

I have never been persuaded (consciously) to buy anything based solely on an advertisement, but I have noticed myself somehow "liking" advertisements for products I already own, and like. For instance, I have a Canon digital camera that is exactly perfect for my needs. I find that I somehow root for Canon now when I see their advertisements.

I'm also definitely susceptible to branding. I do indeed reach for products that are more attractively packaged. I try to avoid it, but it's certainly there.

- Warren
 
  • #15
Loren Booda said:
Web, TV, radio, print media, etc. - whose ads have captivated you, and which of those actually influence you to buy?
"Four out of five dentists recommend Crest" (plus the flouride) influenced me for awhile. I imagine quite a few have at least captivated me enough to try them. Ranier Beer used to have such good commercials that I was actually a little sad to find out the beer sucked.

Astronuc said:
I avoid advertisements, and there is no advertisement that influences me to buy anything. I dont' watch ads on TV - I usually watch Public Broadcasting, and I generally (almost exclusively) listen to Public Radio. If I listen to commercial radio, I change channels or turn down the volume during commercials which I find rather obnoxious. I ignore advertisements in print media.
You turn the volume down?! The commercials are usually better than the shows! Well, except for that 'Head On' commercial.

Moonbear said:
And, last time I went to buy dishwasher detergent, they had a sale on the large size...I figured out the per ounce price and realized it was STILL cheaper to buy the smaller size, even with the larger one on sale! :rolleyes: The brand was determined by trial and error (I started out with the cheapest and just moved up the prices until I got to one that rinsed off completely and actually cleaned the dishes well...I didn't expect the cheapest ones to be all that different from the more expensive ones, but apparently the cheapest of the cheap aren't that good).

I'm surprised there's any difference. In fact, a more powerful jet of water with no detergent at all would probably work best. When I washed dishes in a restaraunt, I don't think I used detergent at all. I just made sure the dishes were rinsed off well before putting them in the rack and the water in the dishwasher was incredibly hot and at least sounded pretty powerful.

Edit: Probably the cheap brands are shooting themselves in the foot by recommending the user use about 2 or 3 times as much as they need. In an article on laundry detergent, there were only two things that had a significant influence on ratings - detergents with optical brighteners (chemicals that react with UV rays) tended to be rated higher and detergents that directed using too much detergent tended to be rated lower (not all of the detergent would rinse out, leaving the clothes stiffer). Of course, with laundry detergent, instead of reducing the amount of detergent in each load, you can tell the buyers to buy fabric softener to counteract the detergent left in their clothes.
 
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  • #16
Thanks for the tip chroot. I guess I'm not that surprised it's BS...and yet, somehow...I...still...want...one...can't...resist...urge...to...
 
  • #17
Colgate; "8 out of 10 dentists can't be wrong".

Hmm, 20% of dentists are wrong?

I hate adverts. Except ones for Honda cars.
 
  • #18
Do commercials now use subliminal advertising? Is it really effective, anyway? Do you believe that unconsciously manipulative commercials are intended to be so?

What is the trashiest product promotion in memory?
 
  • #19
Im influenced by movie commercials! I bet a lot of you are too :wink:

Honestly though, I have a DVR and extremely rarely watch commercials. I usually watch shows on a 1/3 time gap (commercials take up about this amount of the total show...), and then just skip through every commercial. I love some Geico commercials, like this one:

and
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnLaDOLaj3I&mode=related&search=

Of course at work, I hear the same commercials everyday countless numbers of times. There are several cat product commercials, and a few of them include cats making noises. I can immitate every single one of the noises and all of the words. Same goes with the music they play. I can now recite quite well several Spice Girls and Backstreet Boys songs because they play that crap non stop.
 
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  • #21
I think its funny how all the ads here in the U.S. have a British man talking the whole time and there's not often informercials with an American guy. The Cold Heat is crap i tried it and the tip just cracked as if it was just made of simple graphite. Its hillarious how they sell stuff for so cheap and say how much you save. They still have to make some money so it shows you how cheap the item really is.
 
  • #22
Stevedye56 said:
I think its funny how all the ads here in the U.S. have a British man talking the whole time and there's not often informercials with an American guy. The Cold Heat is crap i tried it and the tip just cracked as if it was just made of simple graphite. Its hillarious how they sell stuff for so cheap and say how much you save. They still have to make some money so it shows you how cheap the item really is.

Well now, infomercials - that's a whole nother ball of wax...

"Results not typical. You may die."

"Only 499 payments of 97.811cents."
 
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  • #23
BobG said:
You turn the volume down?! The commercials are usually better than the shows! Well, except for that 'Head On' commercial.
I generally listen to Public Radio, but occassionally I'll listen to a local rock station, which I rarely do. I generally avoid commerical stations, even rock stations, because the announcers are generally too loud, obnoxious, and talk to fast, and I find the commercials are actually worse. I can't believe people would be influenced by such drivel. :yuck:
 
  • #24
BobG said:
I'm surprised there's any difference. In fact, a more powerful jet of water with no detergent at all would probably work best. When I washed dishes in a restaraunt, I don't think I used detergent at all. I just made sure the dishes were rinsed off well before putting them in the rack and the water in the dishwasher was incredibly hot and at least sounded pretty powerful.

Edit: Probably the cheap brands are shooting themselves in the foot by recommending the user use about 2 or 3 times as much as they need.

I found that out by accident. I was running low on detergent, so just added about half the usual amount, and everything came out so much cleaner, without the residue on it. Since I don't have an industrial dishwasher in my kitchen, I have to let the detergent do some of the work. The really cheap ones don't seem to do anything. Maybe if I had a better dishwasher, it wouldn't make much difference, but I'm stuck with the one the place came with right now.
 
  • #25
BobG said:
I'm surprised there's any difference. In fact, a more powerful jet of water with no detergent at all would probably work best. When I washed dishes in a restaraunt, I don't think I used detergent at all. I just made sure the dishes were rinsed off well before putting them in the rack and the water in the dishwasher was incredibly hot and at least sounded pretty powerful.
Commercial dishwashers do use detergents, but they do not change the wash water between loads, they reuse and filter the wash water over and over again. The rinse water is typically VERY hot. You may not have had to put detergent/surfactant into the machine, but it was in there, perhaps in a reservoir that reloaded the wash water once a day or so, as the wash water was dumped.
 
  • #26
I love the Zales jewelry commercials, they list a suggested price of $1,000.00 and say the item is on sale for only $99.00. WOW, WHAT A DEAL!

Then at the end of the commercial they state in fine print that the item might not have ever actually sold at the suggested price. :rolleyes:
 
  • #27
Evo said:
I love the Zales jewelry commercials, they list a suggested price of $1,000.00 and say the item is on sale for only $99.00. WOW, WHAT A DEAL!

Then at the end of the commercial they state in fine print that the item might not have ever actually sold at the suggested price. :rolleyes:
I love the jewelry commercials that claim that you should pay x months of your salary for a diamond engagement ring, or claim that their method of grading diamonds is superior to that of the IGA. What a crock! Diamonds are the most over-hyped and over-priced stones available. The most valuable stones on the world market are rubies, sapphires, and emeralds. I know a man whose parents escaped from China during the cultural revolution. He wears a gold ring in which is mounted an irregular but flawless (to the eye) cabochon blue sapphire that I estimate at perhaps 10 carats. Priceless! I faceted Tsavorites for myself and my wife (though I rarely wear rings). These are green garnets that are found in Tsavo national park. They are the most beautiful green gems available and are far rarer than diamonds, and much prettier and rarer than emeralds. Note: I would gladly pay more for a decent 1 carat Burmese ruby than a 1 carat flawless white diamond. The ruby will sell for a profit, regardless of what deBeers manages to pull off and if a new source of decent diamonds comes on-line deBeers is cooked. They are over-extended as it is, trying to buy up every decent source of diamonds, and then parceling them out in a very controlled fashion to keep the prices high. If a buyer refuses to play their games or even complains about the packages of diamonds that they are offered, deBeers cuts off their rough.
 
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  • #28
Yes, diamonds are price fixed. DeBeers has always controlled the flow of diamonds into the market in order to keep the price artificially inflated.

You don't even want to know what happened to my mom's 5 carat Alexandrite. I still get nauseous whenever I think of it. I didn't know... It was gift from her dad that had a connection to the mine back in the beginning.

They now have to laser imprint serial numbers on diamonds because the new artificial diamonds can no longer be detected witrh diamond scanners. We used to use those to test stones that came in, these latest fakes showed positive. Honestly, I'd rather have a flawless, undectable fake at a fractuion of the price and spend the rest of the money on something practical.
 
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  • #29
Evo said:
You don't even want to know what happened to my mom's 5 carat Alexandrite.
Holy crap! A 5 carat Alexandrite is practically unheard of, and the available stones are often of so-so quality and sub-carat weights. BTW, the fellow that I bought the tsavorite rough from is the son of one of the biggest dealers in Alexandrites. You won't see him at a gem show unless you have a resale license - the retail crowd is not admitted.
 
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  • #30
Evo said:
You don't even want to know what happened to my mom's 5 carat Alexandrite. I still get nauseous whenever I think of it. I didn't know... It was gift from her dad that had a connection to the mine back in the beginning.

As I recall, a young Evo sent it to its demise. :wink:

If I ever meet the right guy, turbo is in charge of directing him toward appropriate engagement ring choices. I used to want onyx, which really would have made some guy happy, but I also used to be more cynical (yeah, really, more so than I am now!) and thought it would be humorous to have a black stone for an engagement (in case anyone ever wondered why I'm still single :rolleyes:). Now I lean more toward sapphire. I like the darker blue color rather than light blue, and if my understanding is right, that's actually a cheaper stone, so I'm still going to make someone happy. White gold would be nice, though if he really insists on splurging, I'll accept platinum (but, in reality, I can't tell the difference, so white gold is plenty good enough...I just don't think a sapphire looks as pretty on a yellow gold setting). It'll match the blue wedding gown I want. :biggrin: Oh, wait, that won't really go well with the pool party idea. I'll have to sort that part out. Maybe I'll go with the blue wedding gown if I end up with an indoor, winter wedding, and the pool party if it's a summer wedding. All I know is I don't want a boring, traditional, just like everyone else's wedding. I'll figure out the details if I ever meet someone crazy enough to want to marry me. :tongue:
 
  • #31
Honestly, I'd rather have a flawless, undectable fake at a fractuion of the price and spend the rest of the money on something practical.

I think the only reason people buy diamonds is because they are rare and expensive and thus exclusive. If cheap undetectable fakes flooded the market, I think they would become tacky soon enough.
 
  • #32
Moonbear said:
If I ever meet the right guy, turbo is in charge of directing him toward appropriate engagement ring choices. I used to want onyx, which really would have made some guy happy, but I also used to be more cynical (yeah, really, more so than I am now!) and thought it would be humorous to have a black stone for an engagement (in case anyone ever wondered why I'm still single :rolleyes:). Now I lean more toward sapphire. I like the darker blue color rather than light blue, and if my understanding is right, that's actually a cheaper stone, so I'm still going to make someone happy.
You're right. US women are not as discerning as Asian women regarding the qualities of colored stones, so the best rubies and sapphires tend not to show up on this market. Instead, we see pink "rubies" that would never be called rubies on the Asian market and inky sapphires. Many of these sapphires are so dark and included that they hardly show any color, even in melee-sized cuts. A good sapphire should be of a color that will hold up well in large-sized stones and is very lightly included. Those are expensive stones.

Edit: Sapphires are a very good choice for an everyday-wear ring like an engagement ring because they are are very hard and tough. For people that work with their hands, I recommend either a bezel mount or a 6 prong Tiffany mount in 10 or 12 karat gold. 14 karat and finer gold is soft and the prongs wear easily, leading to the eventual loss of the stone. For instance, someone who tucks in sheets (makes beds) or puts on work gloves frequently should avoid 4-prong Tiffany mounts and 14 karat or finer gold like the plague, especially if their stone is a $$$ one. You should also tell the jeweler that you work with your hands, and want to have the prongs left a little "meatier" so you won't lose your stone.
 
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  • #33
verty said:
I think the only reason people buy diamonds is because they are rare and expensive and thus exclusive. If cheap undetectable fakes flooded the market, I think they would become tacky soon enough.
The point is that diamonds are not rare. They are one of the more common gem-stones. DeBeers keeps the prices inflated by monopolizing the trade and regulating the supply. If diamonds came to the market at the rate that they are mined, they would be VERY affordable. By comparison, if every woman in the US wanted an engagement ring with a Tsavorite, Alexandrite, or Demantoid stone, they would be out of luck. These stones are exceedingly rare, especially in larger sizes, and any sort of increased demand would price them out of reach of all but the very wealthy.
 

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