The relationship of one of Maxwell's equations to Coulomb's Law

In summary, Maxwell's equation for divergence of electric field is equivalent to Coulomb's Law, as they can both be derived from each other.
  • #1
My textbook tells me that one of Maxwell's equations, namely divergence of E = 4pi * charge density (in cgs) or divergence of E = pi / epsilon nought (in SI) is exactly equivalent to Coulomb's Law.

How in the world is that so?

Any ideas would be appreciated.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Have you tried Googling? The Wikipedia page has a derivation - what don't you understand about it?
 
  • #3
MaestroBach said:
Any ideas would be appreciated.
Maxwell’s ##\nabla\cdot\vec{E}=\rho/\epsilon_0## can be rewritten in an integral form. Try applying that integral form to a spherical volume with a point charge in the center, and taking advantage of the symmetry of that configuration.
 
  • #4
MaestroBach said:
Summary:: Maxwell vs Coulomb

My textbook tells me that one of Maxwell's equations, namely divergence of E = 4pi * charge density (in cgs) or divergence of E = pi / epsilon nought (in SI) is exactly equivalent to Coulomb's Law.

How in the world is that so?

The textbook doesn't explain?! Starting with either one, you can derive the other. Thus they are equivalent.
 

Suggested for: The relationship of one of Maxwell's equations to Coulomb's Law

Replies
1
Views
173
Replies
10
Views
882
Replies
5
Views
720
Replies
2
Views
585
Replies
2
Views
206
Back
Top